All posts by Aly J. Yale

Earned Media vs. Paid Media: What’s the Difference (And Does It Matter?)

Earned Media vs. Paid Media: What’s the Difference (And Does It Matter?) | Haley Brand Aerospace

Both earned media and paid media can offer added exposure, more leads and increased sales for your aviation brand – but the two aren’t one and the same.

While both types work together to support your marketing efforts, effective earned and paid media opportunities grow from very different seedlings: the former from your brand’s reputation and influence, and the latter from your pocketbook and advertising know-how.

Cultivating both is key to a 360-degree marketing strategy that works for the long haul.

Paid Media

Paid media is the simpler one. It allows you to pay (via an advertisement, for example) to promote your message, brand or product in a certain space.

Examples of paid media include:

  • Facebook, Instagram, Twitter or LinkedIn ads
  • Magazine placements
  • Paid contributions to publications or websites
  • Google Ads and other search advertising
  • Public or corporate sponsorships

Paid media is a great way to amplify your message, while also being very strategic with who sees that message, where they’re located and how likely they are to become a customer. Paid media is also a great way to gain exposure for your “owned” media — meaning the content, blogs, videos and resources you’ve created internally for your audience.

Earned Media

Earned media, put simply, is media exposure. It’s when a publication, news organization or some other channel with an audience shares your message, products, content or anything to do with your brand. Earned media is especially powerful because it increases your credibility (it’s someone else saying you’re great — not just you tooting your own horn).

Examples of earned media include:

  • Press mentions (including quotes from your team members or mentions of your products)
  • Positive reviews and testimonials on third-party sites
  • Reposts, shares and retweets on social media
  • Shares and emails of your content, blogs, articles, etc.

Earned media is a little harder to come by, as it’s largely out of your control. You can help your case by connecting with well-established voices and influencers in your space. For our clients, that means aviation and aerospace magazines, reporters, trade shows and others within the industry.

Part of your marketing mix should be owned media, your produced content that is shared with your audience. Materials such as a website, blog, social media accounts, collateral and other materials can be used to build your brand image, promote your products and services, and educate your target audience. In addition, owned media can serve as a valuable tool to help rebuild your reputation after a crisis event.

A Three-Pronged Approach

Really, the best marketing strategy is one that combines earned media, paid media and targeted owned media. This allows you to reach potential customers at all points in their buying journey, as well as leverage key influencers and voices in your industry.

Need help crafting your aviation brand’s three-pronged marketing strategy? Haley Aerospace can help. Get in touch today for a free consult!

 

The Best Social Platforms for an Aviation Brand (And When to Use Them)

The Best Social Platforms for an Aviation Brand (And When to Use Them) | Haley Aerospace Marketing

Social media is vital to any modern aviation marketing strategy. But just like other tools you might use in your efforts, each social site has its own unique quirks and nuances. There’s no one-size-fits-all approach that works across every channel — at least not if you want your bottom line to see positive impact.

Is your aviation brand on social media? Are you just getting started and not sure where to focus your efforts? Here are the top platforms for aviation and aerospace brands — as well as when (and how) to use them:

Twitter

Twitter is all about speed, so it’s great for making news announcements, answering customer questions and concerns, or providing customer service of any kind. It’s also a great way to participate in industry conversations. Make an effort to follow movers and shakers in your space and retweet their news and updates. Comment, like and interact with their content, and they might even give your tweets extra exposure with a retweet of their own.

Facebook

Facebook is great for consumer-facing content. Use it to promote deals and sales you’re running, to share your content offers and blog posts, and to launch targeted ad campaigns for your products and services. It’s also a great venue for promoting events — trade shows, conferences or other happenings you might be hosting or participating in.

Instagram

Instagram is all about imagery, so this is where you’ll share all that FOMO-worthy travel footage, those jaw-dropping flight videos and anything else visually interesting. You can use hashtags to drum up extra exposure for your posts, as well as cross-promote your images on Twitter, Facebook and other channels to drive in new followers. Consider engaging an influencer to really gain some traction on the site.

LinkedIn

LinkedIn is a great recruiting tool and the ideal venue for networking. If you’re a B2B aviation brand, you can use it to connect with potential vendors, buyers and other professionals who might be interested in your services. You can also use LinkedIn to share company news or to post thought leadership articles through the platform’s Pulse publishing feature.

YouTube

For video content, you’ll use YouTube. Depending on your services, you might want to upload product commercials or demos, flight simulations or even live footage of presentations, trade shows or speeches by your CEO. If you want to inspire more brand loyalty and consumer interest, you might also try behind-the-scenes videos around the office or of your team. These can be great ways to show off your company culture and create long-term brand buy-in.

Which is Right for Your Aviation Brand?

Using the right social channels at the right time is the key to creating strong customer connections and a steady stream of online leads. Want help homing in on the best social platforms for your unique aviation brand? Haley Aerospace is here to help. Contact us today for a consultation.

 

Aerospace Email Marketing: How to Do it Better in 2019

Aerospace Email Marketing: What You're Doing Wrong & How to Do it Better | Haley Aerospace Marketing

Email marketing has been around for some time now — and it’s still one of the most successful strategies out there. When done right, it can generate new leads, convert existing ones and even keep your brand top of mind with past customers.

But email marketing has changed over the years and while, as a whole, it’s still a highly successful venture (and a worthwhile investment) for most brands, it’s not one you can rest on your laurels about. Email marketing best practices have changed immensely over the years, and in the aerospace and aviation world, it seems many brands haven’t adjusted their approach since first launching their campaigns.

Do you fall into this category? Have you been using largely the same email marketing techniques since the 2000s? Are your email campaigns on auto drive and just not delivering results? This guide can help.

Aerospace Email Marketing Mistakes to Avoid

When it comes to email marketing, many aviation and aerospace brands are still stuck in 2005. They’re sending out unsolicited messages, failing to segment their audience and forgetting to test their emails. Ultimately, this means a lot of time and resources poured into something that’s just not going to work.

Want to make sure you’re not in the same boat? Here are the top email marketing mistakes to avoid — and what to do instead:

Forgetting to Build on Your Database

Using the same old email list you’ve used for 10 years is not going to improve your results. At every trade show or convention you attend, have a way to collect leads and addresses. On your website, use content offers and blog posts to build your email list even further. Your address book should always be growing and evolving, and you should also be culling out leads that are no longer viable for your business. There’s no point in wasting resources or energy on a dead end.

Scrimping on the Content

Sending out an email when you have company news isn’t enough. If you want to gain something from the leads you’re contacting, you have to give them something in return — something they find valuable. You should have designated resources for content development: a marketer to brainstorm the topics, a copywriter to craft a well-written message and a regular schedule for doing both. Make your content a high priority: it’s one of the most important facets of your strategy.

Failing to Segment Your Audience

Not every email should go to every address on your list. You want to deliver messages that make sense for your subscribers — ones that fit in with where they’re at in the sales funnel, what their unique position/jobs/income level is, and what struggles/hurdles they’re dealing with. This allows you to create the strongest connection with the customer and really start to close that deal. Always segment your email list as much as possible, so you can highly target your content and send it out to the best-fitting potential leads you have.

Phoning in the Subject Lines

Your subject lines can make or break you. Too many brands make them an afterthought — either a boring summary of the content within or a too-long stream of words that gets cut off on a user’s mobile phone. Either way, you’re not doing yourself any favors. If you want that email content to do its job, you need a great, intriguing and curiosity-piquing subject line to help you do it — otherwise, the message won’t even be opened in the first place. Always A/B test a few subject lines before sending out the message to your full list. This will give you the most bang for your buck in the long run.

Ignoring the Metrics

You should be analyzing the metrics of every message you send out. What was your open rate? Your click-through rate? How many users are unsubscribing after each email? Knowing these data points can help you home in on a better strategy moving forward, ultimately improving your results in the long-term.

Sending Unsolicited Messages

Sending unsolicited messages is a big mistake. If someone hasn’t willingly signed up for your emails, don’t send them one. It feels spammy, and it does nothing to endear them to your brand or your products/services. Make sure to also include an unsubscribe link in your emails. The last thing you want to do is waste time and energy on someone who just doesn’t want to hear from you. Make unsubscribing simple and efficient.

Are you committing any of these email marketing faux pas? Want help crafting a more effective outreach strategy? Contact Haley Aerospace marketing today. We’re here to help.

 

3 Mistakes New Aviation Marketers Make

3 Mistakes New Aviation Marketers Make | Haley Aerospace Marketing

If you’re new to being an aviation marketer, you’ll quickly find that it’s a unique beast.

Not only are we selling high-dollar parts, products and machines, we’re also selling experiences. Doing all of these things take a powerful grasp on both our audience and the values and priorities that matter most to them.

Are you new to the aviation marketing world? Just want to brush up on your skills and make sure you’re on the right track? Here are the biggest mistakes newbie aviation marketers make (and how to avoid them):

Not measuring and tracking

Marketing without metrics is just shooting in the dark. If you want to ensure your strategy is an effective one, it needs to be based in cold, hard data. What areas are you failing in? Where are your efforts working and where is there room for improvement? What past efforts have been successful and what led to their success? Analytics can help you answer all of these questions and more.

It’s not just about watching your analytics, though — it’s about watching the right ones. As with anything, not all metrics are created equal, and if you want to drive more sales and get more clients, you have to watch the metrics that are tied to those numbers — the conversion rates on your content offers, the engagement on your social posts and the leads you keep in the funnel after a trade show. Know what your key performance indicators are and keep a good gauge on them at all times. Let them drive your strategy and move your brand forward.

Skipping social

Many aviation marketers feel social media is a waste of time. Are high-dollar buyers really watching your brand on Facebook? Could a Twitter post really bring a new B2B vendor into the fold? You bet it could. In aviation marketing, it’s all about choosing the right social channels to focus on.

For B2B brands, LinkedIn is king, and Twitter can bring in some healthy sales as well. For B2C organizations, visual platforms like Instagram and Snapchat are great options if you’ve got amazing aviation photography because they really draw people to your brand. (You just have to know how to convert them and turn those leads into a sale after that!)

Marketing to the wrong person

You also need to know who you’re marketing to. If you’re a B2B aviation brand, you’re not marketing to the CEO of a company. Instead, you’re trying to reach a buyer for that brand — someone lower on the totem pole, with less of a financial stake and more to prove. They want you to make them look good and they want you to show them how.

For B2C brands, you need to dive into the psyche and demographics of your target audience. What’s their income level? Do they have kids? What stage of life are they in? What’s important to them and what are their values? These should all play a role in both how you market to them and what venues you use to do it.

Always keep the end-buyer’s unique scenario in mind when crafting your marketing efforts. What are their challenges and struggles? What are their pain points? How can you, specifically, help them solve and overcome them? More importantly, how can you convince them of your abilities and earn their trust?

You’re Not Alone

You don’t have to go it alone in aviation marketing. Our experts are here to help point you in the right direction — both on metrics and on strategy. Contact Haley Aerospace today for help with your 2019 aviation marketing.

 

How to Find (And Connect with) the Best Exhibitors for Your Brand at HELI-EXPO

Overwhelmed at HELI-EXPO? How to Find (And Connect with) the Best Exhibitors for Your Brand | Haley Aerospace Marketing

Next month’s 2019 HAI HELI-EXPO in Atlanta is sure to be an educational, productive and, hopefully, profitable event.

But with more than 700 exhibitors and 18,000 industry pros in attendance, it could also get overwhelming, too.

How do you know where to focus your efforts? What booths to spend your limited time on? Which exhibitors to explore partnerships or business relationships with?

This is the struggle of any modern trade show-goer — but it’s not one without a solution. Want to make sure you spend your time and resources as wisely as possible at this year’s 2019 HAI HELI-EXPO? These tips can help:

Study the exhibitor list ahead of time.

You don’t have to set aside hours to do this but take 30 or so minutes to browse the list and get familiar with at least the categories of exhibitors who will be at the event. Do it while waiting at the airport, when you’re on the plane or even just on the Uber ride over. If any names or booths stand out, jot them down on a notepad or on your phone. Make sure to include the booth number, if it’s available.

Go in with two or three overarching goals.

Having a few larger goals for the event can help you home in on the best exhibitors to spend your time with. Are you looking to for advanced avionics systems to upgrade your aircraft? Are you hoping to find a new distributor or part manufacturer with lower costs? Do you need consulting, marketing or branding assistance? Pick two to three overall goals for your visit and let those guide both the exhibitors you visit and the questions/concerns you bring up when you do.

Divide and conquer.

Instead of touring the expo in pairs or groups, give each member of team individual assignments — either a full hall or a handful of specific booths. Make sure to keep the assignments in their vein of expertise, though. Send your marketing director toward the advertising agencies you’d like to learn more about and send your CTO down the hall with the avionics manufacturers you’re considering. This divide-and-conquer method will help you make the most of your limited time on site.

Don’t get distracted.

It can be easy to get distracted at trade shows — especially ones like 2019 HAI HELI-EXPO that have mind-boggling (and massive) technological and aircraft displays to look at. Try not to spend too much time at these eye-catching displays (or worse, just waiting in line for them), and grab a brochure or flier instead. You can also snap a picture on your phone, so you can go back and check out the displays later on.

Stay tuned to social media.

Be sure to watch HAI’s social media, as well as the hashtag #haiexpo19 on Twitter. Not only can this keep you up to date on the latest happenings at the show, but it can also clue you into new exhibitors and booths you might not have heard of yet.

At the end of the day, it’s important to attend 2019 HAI HELI-EXPO with a plan. Know your goals for the trip, have a handful of must-see exhibitors and use your team to divide and conquer once you arrive. And remember, once you start talking with an exhibitor or vendor, if they don’t have the answers you want, or it doesn’t feel right, move on quickly. Your time is limited and wasting it on an exhibitor with no promise means less time with one who could actually help grow your business.

Want help with your next trade show? Want to learn more about our aviation marketing and branding services? Let’s connect in Atlanta next month. Contact us today to schedule a time.

 

How to Capture (And Nurture) More Leads at Heli-Expo

How to Capture (And Nurture) More Leads at Heli-Expo | Haley Aerospace Marketing

Lead capturing should be the ultimate goal of any trade show exhibitor.

Sure, a splashy booth and an amazing demo will get you some foot traffic, but if those visitors don’t know how to reach you after the fact or, worse yet, you don’t know how to reach them, what’s the point of it all?

Without an adequate lead capturing strategy — not to mention a nurturing one to follow it up — your trade show efforts aren’t just ineffective, they are downright pointless.

Want to make sure you’re well-positioned to capture and nurture valuable leads at 2019 HAI HELI-EXPO next month (or whatever your next trade show may be)? Then make sure to heed these tips:

Make It Easy

The faster and easier you can make your lead capturing process, the more likely visitors will be to do it. Don’t make them fill out an entire page of information by hand. They either won’t do it, or they’ll walk away annoyed (and with a cramping hand to boot). Instead, set up a laptop with a simple form on the screen. Require only the bare minimum of info — their name, company and an email address — items they can type in and enter in under 30 seconds. You can also go the old-school route and set up a box for business cards. This takes little to no effort at all and gives you more information than a basic form would.

Integrate It Into the Booth’s Experience

Your lead capture process shouldn’t be an afterthought. Instead, work it into the overall set-up and experience of your booth. Set up your form at the entrance of your booth and require visitors to sign in before seeing your demo, grabbing a brochure or stepping into your display. At the very least, have the form at your booth’s exit, so visitors who were genuinely interested in your products can give you their info.

Give Them Something Useful and Unique

You want to be able to reach your leads, but you also want them to know how to reach you, too. While a brochure or flyer can be nice, they’re not likely to stand out in the crowd — especially once those visitors arrive home with piles upon piles of them.

Want to make sure they think about your brand and your services after the fact? That they can connect with you when you do come to mind? Then send them home with something useful and unique. Maybe it’s a portable coffee cup with your logo and web address on it, or maybe it’s a set of branded earbuds to use on the plane ride home. Whatever it is, make sure it’s something the visitor will use and that it has some form of contact info on it.

Follow Up Quickly

Within a week of the show, follow up with the leads you captured at the event via email. Make sure to include a short reminder of what your booth (and your business) brought to the show, and then detail any show-related discounts or specials you’re running. You might get some bites and you might also get some unsubscribes. Use this to hone your list.

Assign sales reps to the leads you get responses from, remove the unsubscribes, and put the remaining leads into an email drip campaign. Send them valuable content, tips and guidance over the coming weeks and months, and keep your business top of mind. (You never know when they might need your services.)

The Lead Generating Marathon

Remember, lead generation is a marathon, not a sprint. Think of your booth as the initial starting line — the point where it all begins. It’s not until much later, after you’ve built up trust and delivered value, that the leads become loyal, paying customers.

Need help capturing and nurturing leads at your next trade show? Want help in other areas of marketing? Contact Haley Aerospace today or connect with us at HELI-EXPO next month.

 

The Power of Keywords…Or Maybe Not

The Power of Keywords — Or Maybe Not | Aerobrand Company | Haley Aerospace Marketing |

So-called “keywords” play a big role in SEO strategy — and sure, they can bring in leads and customers by helping people find your website.

But traditionally used, they’re just not enough to get you the business you want.

The Problem with Certain Keywords

In an overcrowded place like the web, packing your aerobrand website with keyword phrases like “best autopilot device” or “top aviation company” might seem like a good idea. But this strategy often serves up disappointing results.

Think about how many other brands are trying to rank for those common keyword phrases. Then ask yourself, how many of the users searching for those terms are actually looking for your specific products and services?

Probably only a small fraction, right?

Here’s a crazy thought: instead of labeling your aerobrand with broad terms and phrases that might bring in qualified leads, why not include ones that will only bring them in?

I’m talking about brand-specific, nitty-gritty, deep-dive terms — things like “HeliSAS” (perfect for our friends over at Genesys Aerosystems) or “aerial luxury” (a great phrase for AERIA Luxury Interiors).

These are simple, succinct words and phrases that push users directly to what they’re looking for. Ultimately, that means a higher chance of a real conversion or sale and a much more effective use of time, energy and resources, marketing-wise.

What’s Your Word?

Do you have one of these words or phrases you could include, rather than just relying on big-bucket keywords?

Here at Haley Aerospace, our word is aerobrand. It’s a term that works two-fold for us: one, it speaks to our clientele, aerospace and aviation brands. Two, it explains our services, aerospace branding and marketing.

Once you’ve determined your word, you need to own it. Use it in marketing materials, in blogs and on social media. Work it into your tagline, motto and even email signature. Be known for something uniquely you — something other companies can’t touch and something your future customers will seek out specifically from your brand.

Need help determining a unique search term for your aerobrand? Let us help. Contact Haley Aerospace Marketing today.

 

Four Aerospace Marketing Trends for 2019

Four Aerospace Marketing Trends for 2019 | Aviation Marketing | Haley Aerospace Marketing

Somehow, 2018 is coming to a close, and it’s already time to start mapping out your marketing budget for the new year.

Do you know what you’ll pour your resources into? What platforms and tools to purchase? Where to augment your staff and what trade shows to send them to?

If not, look to current aerospace marketing trends to guide you. Here’s what our clients have been up to in the past few months — and what we expect to see more of as 2019 plows forward:

1. Customization and personalization.

Today’s consumers expect a more targeted, personalized experience than ever before. No more cookie cutter, catch-all marketing campaigns or vague billboard ads that speak to no one in particular. Now, it’s all about speaking directly to the customer — addressing their exact needs, wants, desires and struggles.

It sounds hard, but thanks to the huge amount of data we marketers have access to, it’s not as far-fetched as it might seem. You just need the right measurement tools (analytics platforms, customer interviewing strategies, polls, surveys, etc.), as well as the right team members to watch that data, analyze it and act on it.

2. Embracing the unique.

Instead of trying to be the best or the most expensive or the most luxe, today’s aerospace brands are focused on being their most unique. Rather than touting their awards and high-profile clients, they’re honing in on what makes their products and services different from their competitors — and then using those differentiators to position their brand for better-qualified customers and B2B partners.

3. Going back to square one.

What made your brand successful in the first place? It might have been 75 years ago, but those same things that made you popular then can make you popular again. Take Disney’s recent reboot marathon lately. Why do you think they’ve taken to re-doing every single animated film the company’s ever made? Because those films were their foundation — the thing that got them where they are today.

When in doubt, go back to square one and look at what brought you here. Sometimes, improving your business doesn’t have to mean a total 180-degree change. Small tweaks and incremental alterations in approach can do wonders.

4. Pushing quality over quantity.

Aerospace customers are discerning ones. They know a cheap Facebook ad from an expensive placement in a trade show booklet or industry magazine. Instead of trying to get “more for less,” pouring all your resources into hundreds of unqualified clicks on Facebook or Google, focus your efforts where you know your customers are — even if it means spending a bit more (or bringing in fewer leads) in the process.

2019 is Almost Here

We understand these aerospace marketing trends and can help you create a winning marketing strategy for your aerobrand in 2019. Contact the team at Haley Aerospace Marketing today.

 

The 5 Parts of Brand Personality: Does Your Company Have Them?

The 5 Parts of Brand Personality: Does Your Company Have Them? | Haley Aerospace

The development of a strong brand personality is integral to long-term success in this industry.

Not only can personifying your brand make it more relatable – more relevant, even – for your customers, but it can also give you better insights into how to reach those customers and effectively sell them your products and services.

And in a competitive market like aerospace or aviation? That leg up can make all the difference.

What’s Your Company’s Brand Personality?

In general, the more human you can make your brand feel, the better you can connect with (and build relationships with) your target audience.

Research out of Stanford says we should analyze several dimensions – five, to be exact – to hone in on our brand’s unique characteristics and purpose. These dimensions include:

  • Your sincerity – Are you transparent and bluntly honest? Are you down-to-earth and wholesome? Are you cheerful and sunny
  • Your competence – How reliable are you? What’s your knowledge niche? How successful are you in your field?
  • Your sophistication – Are you high-end and luxe? Are you casual and approachable? Are you charming and quaint?
  • Your ruggedness – How tough and adaptable are you? Are you sweet and sensitive or rough-and-tumble?
  • Your excitement – Are you current and trendy? Are you daring and boundary-pushing? Are you creative and imaginative?

The theory is that you look at all five of these dimensions, and then rate your brand on a scale of 1 to 5 on each one – your brand’s overall sincerity, competence, sophistication, ruggedness and excitement. By doing this, a clear picture of your brand’s overall personality begins to emerge.

Ranking these facets also helps you hone in on the perceptions of your brand – as well as what customers expect and want from you. Then you can better target your marketing messages and more effectively satisfy your customers.

On to New Heights

Once you’ve done the five-dimension exercise, use those insights to strategize and hone in on more effective messaging, marketing and advertising methods. And don’t forget: Brand personalities evolve just like human personalities do. Once a year, do the exercise over and adjust your strategies as needed.

Need help developing your unique aerobrand personality and conveying it to the world? Let Haley Brand Aerospace lead the way. Contact us today.

 

B2B or B2C? It Shouldn’t Matter in Aerospace and Aviation Marketing

B2B or B2C? It Shouldn’t Matter in Aerospace and Aviation Marketing | Haley Aerospace Marketing

In marketing, we typically lump companies into one of two buckets: B2C (business to consumer) or B2B (business to business).

It’s supposed to help us better frame our messaging — to better reach the end-buyer and be more relatable, more valuable and, ideally, more successful.

But when we do this, we’re reducing our relationships with our customers to the bare minimum. They’re just buyers. People who spend money on us. Businesses that keep us afloat.

In today’s world, marketing needs to be more personal — more trust- and relationship-based. If we need to assign it a fancy acronym, B2Me would be the best way to put it.

Looking at B2Me for Aerospace and Aviation Marketing

B2Me means:

  • The purchase is personal. It’s not just a business buying supplies or a consumer buying a product. It’s a person – an individual with a unique personality, tastes, goals and values. Your marketing should not just recognize that, but embrace it.
  • You put yourself in the customer’s shoes. Think from the customer’s standpoint: How will it help ME? How will it better MY life? What problems of MINE will this solve? Why is it worth MY hard-earned money? These are the questions your marketing strategies should address.
  • It’s customized. Whether it’s through email segmentation, unique landing pages or a personal reach-out from your customer service team, your experiences should be customized and personalized to the unique people you do business with. This is how you prove value and build trust.
  • You reward and show gratitude. Great customer relationships are a two-way street. They buy from you; you provide quality products and services. They review you on social media; you retweet them and recognize their efforts. They refer a customer your way; you send them a coupon code as a thank you gift. B2Me means putting in the work to build a good rapport with each and every customer you encounter — no matter what their budget may be.

B2Me means recognizing that customers aren’t just buyers – a consumer with cash or a business with a budget. They’re people. Individuals. Once companies recognize this — and the power it affords them — marketing will be significantly more effective and more lucrative in the long run.

What’s Your B2Me Strategy?

Need help creating a strong B2Me aerospace and aviation marketing strategy for your aerobrand? Contact Haley Aerospace today.

 

 

Aviation Marketing Need a Revamp? Here’s How to Do It

Aviation Marketing Need a Revamp? Here’s How to Do It | Aviation Marketing | Haley Aerospace Marketing

In last week’s post, we covered a recent survey that revealed some pretty telling things about digital marketing in our industry.

The gist? Aviation marketing is super reliant on old-school traditional media, and most companies just aren’t devoting enough effort or budget to things like SEO, social media or search and video advertising. They’re also not measuring their progress, or operating with any sort of consistency.

Does this sound like your company in a nutshell? If so, don’t fret. It’s never too late to course-correct. Here’s where to start to get your aviation marketing back on track:

  1. Ramp up your social efforts – and pay to play. Get more active on social media, and work on upping your organic reach. Post videos, photos and interactive content that pique your customers’ interest, and maybe even try Facebook Live once in a while. Also devote a portion of your budget to social advertising. Instagram and Facebook, in particular, allow for some super deep-dive targeting, and they can be great for bringing in leads and increasing your website conversions.
  2. Know your KPIs and track your progress. Establish what your goals are – both short-term and in the long run. Then, set up the tools you need to measure your progress. Implement the Facebook Pixel on your website so you can track conversions, and make sure the code for Google Analytics is installed, as well. Be sure to have a regular schedule for measuring and reporting on your progress, so you can adjust, tweak and change your strategies to improve their efficacy.
  3. Have a schedule. Don’t go about your marketing all willy-nilly. Implement a posting schedule – for blogs, for social content and even for things like email blasts and newsletters. You need to be cranking out quality content on a regular, consistent basis for it to have a true impact on your bottom line.

Finally, give us a call. We’ll help you create a custom-fit aviation marketing strategy just for your aerobrand – one that’s designed with today’s modern, tech-savvy customers in mind. Contact us today to get started.

 

The State of Digital Marketing in Aviation

The State of Aviation Digital Marketing | Aviation Marketing | Haley Brand Aerospace Marketing

A recent survey of more than 300 aviation executives revealed some startling things about marketing in our industry.

Where aviation digital marketing is behind

Though it seems many companies have made headway in web design and content marketing (most have mobile-friendly websites and more than 70 percent are doing content marketing), the industry is lagging behind when it comes to more advanced tactics — things like SEO, organic social media strategy and, an even bigger shocker, paid search advertising.

What’s worse: Those that are using online advertising are leaving money on the table. A large majority are using basic geographic and demographic targeting, but few are using more powerful strategies like lookalike audiences, retargeting pixels or behavioral marketing. All of these can reduce ad waste and improve conversions on digital advertising campaigns.

This could come down to lack of experience with these tools, but it also looks like budgets — or at least budget allotment — is to blame. A whopping 42 percent of respondents are spending less than $5,000 a year on digital marketing.

Social status

Facebook reigns supreme as the industry’s foremost social platform, with more than 70 percent of respondents saying their company is on board. More than half also have a LinkedIn presence.

Instagram and Twitter are only in use at around 30 percent of organizations, while Snapchat falls last in line, at less than 10 percent. A big 38 percent aren’t advertising on social media whatsoever.

As far as content on these platforms goes, most aviation organizations are posting static images and video. Only 17 percent are using polls and just 13 percent have used live video.

Email isn’t stale

The one effort it seems aviation pros can agree on is email marketing. A full three-quarters of respondents send out regular newsletters and email blasts, with about 60 percent saying they do it once or twice a month.

Most are using their emails to promote company news and press releases, but about a quarter are also using them to establish themselves as thought leaders or to generate leads. About a third automate and segment their emails.

Room for improvement

Fortunately, executives at least somewhat recognize the need for improvement. Nearly 100 percent of respondents said they need to better their analytics and measurement efforts, while about half said they could do more to increase website leads. Others recognized a need to improve on content marketing, social media, targeting and SEO.

Currently, about 40 percent aren’t sure how much of their traffic comes from organic search and only around 30 percent are using event tracking, KPIs and goal conversions to measure progress — yet another sign SEO and analytics should take the forefront in the coming years.

There’s also a lot of room to improve on consistency. Less than 20 percent of companies are creating weekly thought leadership pieces, and 15 percent say they only do it once a year. Consistent, optimized content is crucial to bringing in leads, converting them and improving your site’s search presence.

How can you improve?

Do any of these results ring true for your aerobrand? If so, let us know. We’ll help you get on track with your digital marketing.

 

5 Steps to Revitalizing (and Re-launching) an Old Brand

5 Steps to Revitalizing (and Re-launching) an Old Brand | Haley Aerospace Marketing

There comes a time in any brand’s story when it’s time for a change – time to kick things up a notch and remind everyone that you’re there and you’re special.

But breathing new life into an old brand is easier than said than done, especially if you’ve got a long-established company on your hands.

So, what’s the key to revitalizing your brand and re-launching it with success? Just follow these five steps:

1. Aim for real change.

Brand revitalization isn’t about doing the same old thing in a new way. It’s about re-inventing that old thing and bringing new value and meaning. It’s about evolution and realigning your values and mission with the changing trends of your industry – and audience. It requires rejecting the status quo, challenging your existing beliefs and stepping outside your comfort zone.

2. Get everyone on board.

Make people believe in your branding – both internally and externally. To do this, get others involved in your revitalization process. Bring in employees outside of your marketing department, and get people from all corners of the organization on board. Survey customers and members of your target audience about your efforts and get their input. Don’t do your rebranding in a vacuum!

3. Give your audience a reason to care.

You’re rebranding. So what? What’s in it for your audience? Why should they pay attention? More importantly, why shouldn’t the rebranding worry them? Many customers think there are problems afoot when you start touching an old brand. Put their minds at ease by building anticipation. Intrigue them and get them excited about the changes to come.

4. Be sweeping.

Revitalizing your brand takes more than just a logo update or a new slogan. It should affect everything you do across the organization – from the design and verbiage on your website to your sales and customer services processes. Align your internal resources to make sure your rebranding is comprehensive – and consistent.

5. Measure, test and measure some more.

Know your metrics and KPIs, and track how your rebranding impacts those. You might not hit the mark right off the bat – and that’s OK. Use data to make slight changes, re-calibrate and measure again, and eventually, you’ll land on something that hits home with your audience.

Want more help giving your old aerobrand new life? Haley Brand Aerospace can help. Get in touch with our branding experts today to get started.

 

How Aerospace Brands Can Stay Relevant in Changing Times

How Aerospace Brands Can Stay Relevant in Changing Times | Haley Aerospace | Aerospace and Aviation Branding

Thanks to technology, consumers are in more control than ever. They can research and compare brands in an instant, price-shop with just a few clicks and make a purchase even faster.

And as this control grows, brands get lost in the shuffle.

They’re easily cast aside. Overpowered by the next big thing. Deemed behind-the-times or boring.

How do you keep your brand from falling victim, too? It all comes down to relevance.

Building Relevant Aerospace Brands

You don’t need the best technology or the latest, greatest innovation to stay relevant. In fact, if that’s all you have to offer your customers, that pretty much guarantees only flash-in-the-pan success at best.

The true staying power lies with relevant aerospace brands. Brands that know how connect with their customers on a deeper level – how to engage them, excite them and keep them interested over and over.

To do this, brands need to:

  1. Know their purpose. What’s your reason for being? Your purpose for existing? Brands that know their purpose are able to singularly drive their efforts toward that goal. Every product is made with it in mind, and every marketing message is written for that reason as well. Think of Disney. As a brand, its purpose is simple – and one likely shared by millions of parents who buy its products annually: to make kids happy. Hone in on your simple, singular purpose and let it drive you.
  2. Offer an experience. It’s not just about selling products or services. It’s about delivering an all-encompassing experience that gives customers more than just one-off satisfaction. They will buy your part or system now, and later down the line, they’ll come back for repairs, maintenance, replacements or other needs. Brand loyalty develops when a customer’s need is always met – and met to its fullest – time after time. So use data and tech to anticipate those future needs and deliver on them seamlessly and with the same passion as the first go-round.
  3. Inspire internally. Great brands aren’t made by great marketing (of course it doesn’t hurt!) The most impactful aerospace brands are ones where internal culture has created employee-advocates – people who invest their time, energy and passions wholeheartedly into the company. They believe in the brand’s purpose and they want to share its message with the world. Invest in your people, and they invest in you. It’s a simple mantra all the best organizations operate by.

The Bottom Line

Aerospace brands that can accomplish these three tasks will consistently remain relevant – no matter what tech or developments go on around them. Want to ensure your aerobrand stays relevant in the changing times? Haley’s aerospace branding experts are here to help.

 

Top-down or bottom-up: Which branding strategy is right for you?

Top-down or bottom-up: Which branding strategy is right for you? | Haley Aerospace Marketing

For large aerospace and aviation organizations, there are two options when it comes to branding: You can brand from the top down or from the bottom up.

Each option comes with its unique pros and cons, and the best choice really depends on what the company’s overall goals are, how well known and established the organization is, and the differences between its unique branches and product lines.

Not sure which branding strategy is best for your specific aviation company? Let’s examine both to find out.

Top-Down Branding

With a top-down branding strategy, everything starts with the branding of the larger, all-encompassing organization.

Google, for example, is a top-down branded company. All its unique product lines and services – no matter how different they may be – have some sort of Google connection to them. There’s Gmail, Google Drive, Google+, Google Documents, etc.

The reason for following this strategy? It’s likely to leverage Google’s known clout in the tech world. Why create a new brand name and style, when the current one is already so well known and successful? Google can give its new products a leg up on the competition simply by lending its namesake.

Bottom-Up Branding

On the opposite end of the spectrum is bottom-up branding, which has an overarching brand, as well as several sub-brands that stand alone.

A good example of bottom-up branding can be seen with the candy company Mars. Unlike Hershey, which has products like Hershey Kisses and Hershey Chocolate Bars, the Mars company’s products have names and brands all their own. M&M’s, 3 Musketeers, Snickers and Twix are just a few of the sub-brands under the Mars name.

Though Mars itself is certainly well known in the candy world, many of its sub-brands are, arguably, even more established. This is common with consumer brands – particularly ones where products vary greatly. It’s also often a result of mergers and acquisitions.

Need Branding Guidance? Let Us Help

In the aviation world, it’s not uncommon for companies to have numerous product lines or services branching off. But should those carry the same name or stand alone as brands in their own right? The question is a hard one – and it varies from organization to organization.

Want help honing in on what strategy is most appropriate (and profitable) for your aerobrand? Get in touch. Our branding experts are here to help.

 

Think YouTube’s Only for B2C? Think Again, Aviation Brands

Think YouTube’s Only for B2C? Think Again, Aviation Brands | Haley Aerospace and Aviation Marketing

Full of makeup tutorials, video game reviews and cat videos, it’s easy to think that YouTube is a platform best reserved for teens and tweens.

But while that demo may account for a fair share of YouTube’s audience, they’re not alone. In fact, users 35 and up are spending more time on the site than ever, and a whopping 73 percent even say they use it for how-to content on a regular basis.

That spells immense opportunity for B2B aviation brands – opportunity to reach more prospects, convert more leads and, ultimately, sell more products.

Thinking of using YouTube videos to augment your B2B marketing efforts? Here are some tips to help:

Optimize for the platform

Just like you would on your website, work carefully chosen SEO keywords into your videos’ descriptions, tags, titles and more. This will help people find you on YouTube’s search function, as well as in Google and other search engines. You should also make sure to include timestamps in your video, as this makes it easier for users to skip ahead or come back for a second look. (Show them you value their time as much as you value their money!)

Brand it

Maybe it’s a simple backdrop behind the desk or a logo on your shirt, but make sure you’re consistently showing your brand in the video. Just don’t go overboard and inundate viewers with in-your-face branding placements.

Don’t script too much

Steer clear of over-rehearsing or scripting your videos down to the smallest detail. You want your videos to be authentic and to build trust. A few mistakes here and there only add to your relatability.

Develop your personality

YouTube, at its heart, is meant to be entertaining, so have fun with your videos. Develop a voice and infuse your content with a personality that’s unique to your brand. Carry that personality through every video – no matter what the topic. It’s what will keep people coming back for more.

Enhance your videos with a blog post

Have more to say on a subject? Don’t drone on and on in a 45-minute video. Keep your videos short and sweet, and supplement them with a more detailed blog post instead. Embed the video into your post or link to it, and give it a quick SEO boost.

Aviation brands should be consistent

Have a schedule for your posts, so viewers know when to expect and tune in to your content. You should also work to build anticipation for upcoming videos by posting on social media or releasing teaser videos as you’re prepping the content.

Leverage your channels

“If you build it, they will come” doesn’t necessarily work for YouTube, so make sure to leverage your existing marketing channels to distribute your videos. Share them on Facebook and Instagram, post them on your website and blog, and send them in an email to your most loyal customers. If it’s good enough, they’ll share it as well, and your reach will only snowball from there.

Did You Know?

Haley Aerospace started as Haley Films, so we know our way around video production. Want help getting your B2B YouTube strategy off the ground? We help aerobrands. Get in touch today to discuss your goals.

 

3 Ways to Keep Your Marketing Agile

3 Ways to Keep Your Marketing Agile | Haley Aerospace Marketing

The aviation sector is a fast-paced one, with new technologies and innovations cropping up daily. Add in the constantly changing digital landscape, and it can often be hard to keep your marketing efforts relevant.

Are you using the right platforms? Are you speaking the right lingo? Are you taking out ads in the right publications or expos?

It’s easy to second-guess yourself.

And though there’s certainly a lot of trial-and-error involved when marketing in today’s quick-moving world of aviation, success isn’t impossible. The key is to remain agile while keeping these important cornerstones in mind every time:

  1. Always tell a good story. Great storytelling is at the heart of all effective marketing strategies. Your message needs to move the customer – to resonate at their core, pull at their heartstrings or spur them into action. It doesn’t matter if you’re posting a photo to Instagram, writing a landing page for a new product or coming up with a slogan for your new ad campaign. It’s the story that holds the key.
  2. Continue to innovate. Don’t be afraid to try new things. While it may be hard to get your higher-ups on board with a new-fangled tool or marketing tactic, you should make your best effort to sway them. Continuing to challenge yourself (and your customers) is vital to staying relevant and top-of-mind in today’s ever-evolving digital world. It’s especially important in aviation and aerospace, where customers don’t just want you to be on the cutting edge – they downright expect it.
  3. Engage your target audience regularly and consistently. Whether it’s through carrier pigeons or the latest, greatest social media platform, if you’re engaging and interacting with your customers on a consistent, reliable basis, then you’re doing your job. More importantly? The more you engage them, the more you get to know them – and that means more effective marketing on the whole.

The outlets and methods for your messaging may change, but as long as you keep these tenets at heart, your brand can – and will – remain relevant, even in changing tides.

Want help adapting your aerobrand’s marketing efforts to today’s savvy consumers? Haley Aerospace can help.

 

Does Your Aerospace Brand’s Website Speak to Millennials?

 

Does Your Aerospace Brand’s Website Speak to Millennials? | Haley Aerospace Marketing

Millennials aren’t kids anymore. They make up the bulk of the U.S. workforce, and likely the majority of your clients as well.

As such, it’s important you tailor your efforts to their needs, their style and their way of thinking.

Pivot your marketing strategies to include more SEO and social media, use PR to tout the values and social causes you believe in, and most importantly, revamp your website to fall in line with their tech-savvy expectations.

Because many Millennials are digital natives, growing up with a phone in one hand and a laptop in the other. That last one is the most crucial. To a Millennial, your web presence is the only marketing tool that matters – and if it’s not up to snuff, they’ll look elsewhere to find what they need.

Not sure where to start in revamping your aerospace website to speak to Millennials? Here’s how to do it:

  • Make sure it’s mobile-friendly. This doesn’t just mean it merely functions on a mobile phone, with a bare-bones menu and a few paragraphs of copy. It needs to offer the full scope of your web experience, only on a small touchscreen phone or portable tablet. Keep in mind: About a third of all Millennial internet usage is on mobile devices. If your site’s not mobile-friendly, you’re losing a huge chunk of potential customers every day.
  • Localize your SEO. Optimizing for a few general keywords isn’t enough to reach Millennials through search engines. They’re a savvy bunch, and they know how to craft a search to find exactly what they need in a matter of seconds. If you’re not optimizing specifically enough, you won’t even show up on their radar (but your competitors might).
  • Add a blog to your site – Millennials love blogs, subscribing to them, sharing them on social media, and putting their tips and tricks into action. Blogs can also help enhance your SEO efforts, meaning you’ve got an added shot at showing up in search results when those tech-savvy customers come calling.

In the end, a smooth, seamless online experience is what Millennials are looking for, no matter what device they’re using or from where they’re accessing your site. Make sure they’re getting just that, and you’ll be one step closer to winning them over – and their potential business.

Want help getting your aerospace brand’s website in line with Millennial expectations? We can help. Get in touch with Haley Aerospace Marketing today.

 

Are You Making These Dangerous Aviation Branding Mistakes?

Are You Making These Dangerous Aviation Branding Mistakes? | Haley Aerospace and Aviation Marketing

It doesn’t matter how big your company is or how many products you’ve sold. In aviation branding, even the smallest mistakes can cost you.

We’ve seen it ourselves.

Want to make sure an aviation branding mishap doesn’t throw your company off course? Here are the biggest mistakes we’ve seen to date:

1. Thinking branding is a one-time to-do.

Too many companies approach branding as a one-time project – particularly in the old-school industry of aviation.

Though your organization certainly does need a physical, tangible branding suite with defined logos, colors and slogans, the work doesn’t stop once these are checked off your to-do list.

In fact, branding never stops.

That’s because branding isn’t just a noun. It’s a verb. It’s an ongoing effort to carve your company’s place in the world – to make it stand out in customers’ minds, to oust the competition, and to strengthen the unique message and value you have to offer. It requires constant work and attention, and it should be a factor in every effort you undertake.

2. Forgetting why you started.

Your company first started for a reason. Maybe there was a void in the market you wanted to fill, or maybe you found a way to do it better, bigger or faster. Maybe you just had a great passion for the industry. Whatever that reason was, it should remain at your company’s core today.

Your branding efforts should revolve around that original vision, and instilling that initial idea or passion within your customers should be the end goal. If it’s not, refocus on what makes your company who it is – and find ways to drive that home with your target audience.

3. Being too internally focused.

Your team might have great ideas, but if they don’t know who they’re talking to or what challenges that audience is facing, they’re never going to create branding strategies that truly resonate.

Great branding requires working from the outside in – understanding your customers’ needs, wants, desires and even demographics first, and then positioning your brand to meet those unique requirements in every way possible.

It might sound difficult, but the digital landscape we live in has made tuning in to customer feedback incredibly easy. Use social media, online reviews, surveys and other tools to really get to know your audience and what makes them tick.

4. Putting the branding burden on one department.

Branding isn’t an effort reserved just for your marketing department. It should drive every strategy across every division and team in your organization.

From sales and customer service to marketing and IT, every department needs to be on board with your branding, using it to create targeted, purposeful solutions that really resonate with your audience. In fact, representatives from each team should be involved in creating your branding, so that it truly speaks to your organization as a whole from the outset.

How Does Your Aviation Branding Stack Up?

Have you made any of these aviation branding mistakes? Want help honing in on the right strategy for your unique business and customers? We can help. Get in touch with Haley Aerospace & Aviation Marketing today.

 

What Journalists Want: How to Up Your Aerospace PR Game & Get More Traction

What Journalists Want: How to Up Your Aerospace PR Game & Get More Traction | Haley Aerospace Marketing

Journalists are the gatekeepers for us PR folk. They have the power over which press releases make the news, what latest developments see a wider audience and which of your competitors get valuable print real estate.

As such, cultivating great relationships with them is crucial – particularly ones who specialize in the aerospace industry.

But journalists are busy. They don’t have time for networking, schmoozing or chatting on the phone. They want to get down to business, and they want those bylines.

So how do you build great relationships with them? You give them just that.

  • Keep it concise. Journalists are big on brevity. They don’t want to read three pages of PR jargon, nor do they want to sift through spreadsheets and dozens of data points. Make your pitch as concise and to the point as possible, and don’t waste their time.
  • Know their niche. If Alice specializes in covering helicopter news, don’t inundate her with press releases about passenger planes or other info she’s not able to cover. Keep an updated list of all your contacts, with detailed information on what types of stories they cover. Try to keep your pitches and press releases as in line with these interests as possible. You don’t want to end up on any spam lists!
  • Make their job easy. Don’t make journalists jump through hoops just to give you coverage. Make their job easy by giving them the who, what, where and why up front. Use bullet points, and break down why your story is important and should be covered.
  • Give them quotes. Chasing down interviews is the worst (and most time-consuming) part of a journalist’s job. If you can give them prewritten quotes or, at the very least, a few preestablished interview times when your subject matter experts are available, that’s a great way to endear them to your brand and get them to cover you.
  • Offer them exclusives. Most journalists don’t want to cover the exact same news as Joe in the next building over. They want something unique – something that stands out and makes their story a step above the rest. Consider giving certain journalists exclusive or early access to your news, so there’s something in it for them.

Here at Haley Aerospace, many of our aerospace PR and marketing experts are former journalists – so they know what it takes to get noticed and put in print. Want help getting your brand valuable news real estate? Get in touch today.