Category Archives: Aerospace Marketing

3 Mistakes New Aviation Marketers Make

3 Mistakes New Aviation Marketers Make | Haley Aerospace Marketing

If you’re new to being an aviation marketer, you’ll quickly find that it’s a unique beast.

Not only are we selling high-dollar parts, products and machines, we’re also selling experiences. Doing all of these things take a powerful grasp on both our audience and the values and priorities that matter most to them.

Are you new to the aviation marketing world? Just want to brush up on your skills and make sure you’re on the right track? Here are the biggest mistakes newbie aviation marketers make (and how to avoid them):

Not measuring and tracking

Marketing without metrics is just shooting in the dark. If you want to ensure your strategy is an effective one, it needs to be based in cold, hard data. What areas are you failing in? Where are your efforts working and where is there room for improvement? What past efforts have been successful and what led to their success? Analytics can help you answer all of these questions and more.

It’s not just about watching your analytics, though — it’s about watching the right ones. As with anything, not all metrics are created equal, and if you want to drive more sales and get more clients, you have to watch the metrics that are tied to those numbers — the conversion rates on your content offers, the engagement on your social posts and the leads you keep in the funnel after a trade show. Know what your key performance indicators are and keep a good gauge on them at all times. Let them drive your strategy and move your brand forward.

Skipping social

Many aviation marketers feel social media is a waste of time. Are high-dollar buyers really watching your brand on Facebook? Could a Twitter post really bring a new B2B vendor into the fold? You bet it could. In aviation marketing, it’s all about choosing the right social channels to focus on.

For B2B brands, LinkedIn is king, and Twitter can bring in some healthy sales as well. For B2C organizations, visual platforms like Instagram and Snapchat are great options if you’ve got amazing aviation photography because they really draw people to your brand. (You just have to know how to convert them and turn those leads into a sale after that!)

Marketing to the wrong person

You also need to know who you’re marketing to. If you’re a B2B aviation brand, you’re not marketing to the CEO of a company. Instead, you’re trying to reach a buyer for that brand — someone lower on the totem pole, with less of a financial stake and more to prove. They want you to make them look good and they want you to show them how.

For B2C brands, you need to dive into the psyche and demographics of your target audience. What’s their income level? Do they have kids? What stage of life are they in? What’s important to them and what are their values? These should all play a role in both how you market to them and what venues you use to do it.

Always keep the end-buyer’s unique scenario in mind when crafting your marketing efforts. What are their challenges and struggles? What are their pain points? How can you, specifically, help them solve and overcome them? More importantly, how can you convince them of your abilities and earn their trust?

You’re Not Alone

You don’t have to go it alone in aviation marketing. Our experts are here to help point you in the right direction — both on metrics and on strategy. Contact Haley Aerospace today for help with your 2019 aviation marketing.

 

How to Capture (And Nurture) More Leads at Heli-Expo

How to Capture (And Nurture) More Leads at Heli-Expo | Haley Aerospace Marketing

Lead capturing should be the ultimate goal of any trade show exhibitor.

Sure, a splashy booth and an amazing demo will get you some foot traffic, but if those visitors don’t know how to reach you after the fact or, worse yet, you don’t know how to reach them, what’s the point of it all?

Without an adequate lead capturing strategy — not to mention a nurturing one to follow it up — your trade show efforts aren’t just ineffective, they are downright pointless.

Want to make sure you’re well-positioned to capture and nurture valuable leads at 2019 HAI HELI-EXPO next month (or whatever your next trade show may be)? Then make sure to heed these tips:

Make It Easy

The faster and easier you can make your lead capturing process, the more likely visitors will be to do it. Don’t make them fill out an entire page of information by hand. They either won’t do it, or they’ll walk away annoyed (and with a cramping hand to boot). Instead, set up a laptop with a simple form on the screen. Require only the bare minimum of info — their name, company and an email address — items they can type in and enter in under 30 seconds. You can also go the old-school route and set up a box for business cards. This takes little to no effort at all and gives you more information than a basic form would.

Integrate It Into the Booth’s Experience

Your lead capture process shouldn’t be an afterthought. Instead, work it into the overall set-up and experience of your booth. Set up your form at the entrance of your booth and require visitors to sign in before seeing your demo, grabbing a brochure or stepping into your display. At the very least, have the form at your booth’s exit, so visitors who were genuinely interested in your products can give you their info.

Give Them Something Useful and Unique

You want to be able to reach your leads, but you also want them to know how to reach you, too. While a brochure or flyer can be nice, they’re not likely to stand out in the crowd — especially once those visitors arrive home with piles upon piles of them.

Want to make sure they think about your brand and your services after the fact? That they can connect with you when you do come to mind? Then send them home with something useful and unique. Maybe it’s a portable coffee cup with your logo and web address on it, or maybe it’s a set of branded earbuds to use on the plane ride home. Whatever it is, make sure it’s something the visitor will use and that it has some form of contact info on it.

Follow Up Quickly

Within a week of the show, follow up with the leads you captured at the event via email. Make sure to include a short reminder of what your booth (and your business) brought to the show, and then detail any show-related discounts or specials you’re running. You might get some bites and you might also get some unsubscribes. Use this to hone your list.

Assign sales reps to the leads you get responses from, remove the unsubscribes, and put the remaining leads into an email drip campaign. Send them valuable content, tips and guidance over the coming weeks and months, and keep your business top of mind. (You never know when they might need your services.)

The Lead Generating Marathon

Remember, lead generation is a marathon, not a sprint. Think of your booth as the initial starting line — the point where it all begins. It’s not until much later, after you’ve built up trust and delivered value, that the leads become loyal, paying customers.

Need help capturing and nurturing leads at your next trade show? Want help in other areas of marketing? Contact Haley Aerospace today or connect with us at HELI-EXPO next month.

 

The Power of Keywords…Or Maybe Not

The Power of Keywords — Or Maybe Not | Aerobrand Company | Haley Aerospace Marketing |

So-called “keywords” play a big role in SEO strategy — and sure, they can bring in leads and customers by helping people find your website.

But traditionally used, they’re just not enough to get you the business you want.

The Problem with Certain Keywords

In an overcrowded place like the web, packing your aerobrand website with keyword phrases like “best autopilot device” or “top aviation company” might seem like a good idea. But this strategy often serves up disappointing results.

Think about how many other brands are trying to rank for those common keyword phrases. Then ask yourself, how many of the users searching for those terms are actually looking for your specific products and services?

Probably only a small fraction, right?

Here’s a crazy thought: instead of labeling your aerobrand with broad terms and phrases that might bring in qualified leads, why not include ones that will only bring them in?

I’m talking about brand-specific, nitty-gritty, deep-dive terms — things like “HeliSAS” (perfect for our friends over at Genesys Aerosystems) or “aerial luxury” (a great phrase for AERIA Luxury Interiors).

These are simple, succinct words and phrases that push users directly to what they’re looking for. Ultimately, that means a higher chance of a real conversion or sale and a much more effective use of time, energy and resources, marketing-wise.

What’s Your Word?

Do you have one of these words or phrases you could include, rather than just relying on big-bucket keywords?

Here at Haley Aerospace, our word is aerobrand. It’s a term that works two-fold for us: one, it speaks to our clientele, aerospace and aviation brands. Two, it explains our services, aerospace branding and marketing.

Once you’ve determined your word, you need to own it. Use it in marketing materials, in blogs and on social media. Work it into your tagline, motto and even email signature. Be known for something uniquely you — something other companies can’t touch and something your future customers will seek out specifically from your brand.

Need help determining a unique search term for your aerobrand? Let us help. Contact Haley Aerospace Marketing today.

 

Four Aerospace Marketing Trends for 2019

Four Aerospace Marketing Trends for 2019 | Aviation Marketing | Haley Aerospace Marketing

Somehow, 2018 is coming to a close, and it’s already time to start mapping out your marketing budget for the new year.

Do you know what you’ll pour your resources into? What platforms and tools to purchase? Where to augment your staff and what trade shows to send them to?

If not, look to current aerospace marketing trends to guide you. Here’s what our clients have been up to in the past few months — and what we expect to see more of as 2019 plows forward:

1. Customization and personalization.

Today’s consumers expect a more targeted, personalized experience than ever before. No more cookie cutter, catch-all marketing campaigns or vague billboard ads that speak to no one in particular. Now, it’s all about speaking directly to the customer — addressing their exact needs, wants, desires and struggles.

It sounds hard, but thanks to the huge amount of data we marketers have access to, it’s not as far-fetched as it might seem. You just need the right measurement tools (analytics platforms, customer interviewing strategies, polls, surveys, etc.), as well as the right team members to watch that data, analyze it and act on it.

2. Embracing the unique.

Instead of trying to be the best or the most expensive or the most luxe, today’s aerospace brands are focused on being their most unique. Rather than touting their awards and high-profile clients, they’re honing in on what makes their products and services different from their competitors — and then using those differentiators to position their brand for better-qualified customers and B2B partners.

3. Going back to square one.

What made your brand successful in the first place? It might have been 75 years ago, but those same things that made you popular then can make you popular again. Take Disney’s recent reboot marathon lately. Why do you think they’ve taken to re-doing every single animated film the company’s ever made? Because those films were their foundation — the thing that got them where they are today.

When in doubt, go back to square one and look at what brought you here. Sometimes, improving your business doesn’t have to mean a total 180-degree change. Small tweaks and incremental alterations in approach can do wonders.

4. Pushing quality over quantity.

Aerospace customers are discerning ones. They know a cheap Facebook ad from an expensive placement in a trade show booklet or industry magazine. Instead of trying to get “more for less,” pouring all your resources into hundreds of unqualified clicks on Facebook or Google, focus your efforts where you know your customers are — even if it means spending a bit more (or bringing in fewer leads) in the process.

2019 is Almost Here

We understand these aerospace marketing trends and can help you create a winning marketing strategy for your aerobrand in 2019. Contact the team at Haley Aerospace Marketing today.

 

The 5 Parts of Brand Personality: Does Your Company Have Them?

The 5 Parts of Brand Personality: Does Your Company Have Them? | Haley Aerospace

The development of a strong brand personality is integral to long-term success in this industry.

Not only can personifying your brand make it more relatable – more relevant, even – for your customers, but it can also give you better insights into how to reach those customers and effectively sell them your products and services.

And in a competitive market like aerospace or aviation? That leg up can make all the difference.

What’s Your Company’s Brand Personality?

In general, the more human you can make your brand feel, the better you can connect with (and build relationships with) your target audience.

Research out of Stanford says we should analyze several dimensions – five, to be exact – to hone in on our brand’s unique characteristics and purpose. These dimensions include:

  • Your sincerity – Are you transparent and bluntly honest? Are you down-to-earth and wholesome? Are you cheerful and sunny
  • Your competence – How reliable are you? What’s your knowledge niche? How successful are you in your field?
  • Your sophistication – Are you high-end and luxe? Are you casual and approachable? Are you charming and quaint?
  • Your ruggedness – How tough and adaptable are you? Are you sweet and sensitive or rough-and-tumble?
  • Your excitement – Are you current and trendy? Are you daring and boundary-pushing? Are you creative and imaginative?

The theory is that you look at all five of these dimensions, and then rate your brand on a scale of 1 to 5 on each one – your brand’s overall sincerity, competence, sophistication, ruggedness and excitement. By doing this, a clear picture of your brand’s overall personality begins to emerge.

Ranking these facets also helps you hone in on the perceptions of your brand – as well as what customers expect and want from you. Then you can better target your marketing messages and more effectively satisfy your customers.

On to New Heights

Once you’ve done the five-dimension exercise, use those insights to strategize and hone in on more effective messaging, marketing and advertising methods. And don’t forget: Brand personalities evolve just like human personalities do. Once a year, do the exercise over and adjust your strategies as needed.

Need help developing your unique aerobrand personality and conveying it to the world? Let Haley Brand Aerospace lead the way. Contact us today.

 

Aviation Marketing Need a Revamp? Here’s How to Do It

Aviation Marketing Need a Revamp? Here’s How to Do It | Aviation Marketing | Haley Aerospace Marketing

In last week’s post, we covered a recent survey that revealed some pretty telling things about digital marketing in our industry.

The gist? Aviation marketing is super reliant on old-school traditional media, and most companies just aren’t devoting enough effort or budget to things like SEO, social media or search and video advertising. They’re also not measuring their progress, or operating with any sort of consistency.

Does this sound like your company in a nutshell? If so, don’t fret. It’s never too late to course-correct. Here’s where to start to get your aviation marketing back on track:

  1. Ramp up your social efforts – and pay to play. Get more active on social media, and work on upping your organic reach. Post videos, photos and interactive content that pique your customers’ interest, and maybe even try Facebook Live once in a while. Also devote a portion of your budget to social advertising. Instagram and Facebook, in particular, allow for some super deep-dive targeting, and they can be great for bringing in leads and increasing your website conversions.
  2. Know your KPIs and track your progress. Establish what your goals are – both short-term and in the long run. Then, set up the tools you need to measure your progress. Implement the Facebook Pixel on your website so you can track conversions, and make sure the code for Google Analytics is installed, as well. Be sure to have a regular schedule for measuring and reporting on your progress, so you can adjust, tweak and change your strategies to improve their efficacy.
  3. Have a schedule. Don’t go about your marketing all willy-nilly. Implement a posting schedule – for blogs, for social content and even for things like email blasts and newsletters. You need to be cranking out quality content on a regular, consistent basis for it to have a true impact on your bottom line.

Finally, give us a call. We’ll help you create a custom-fit aviation marketing strategy just for your aerobrand – one that’s designed with today’s modern, tech-savvy customers in mind. Contact us today to get started.

 

How Aerospace Brands Can Stay Relevant in Changing Times

How Aerospace Brands Can Stay Relevant in Changing Times | Haley Aerospace | Aerospace and Aviation Branding

Thanks to technology, consumers are in more control than ever. They can research and compare brands in an instant, price-shop with just a few clicks and make a purchase even faster.

And as this control grows, brands get lost in the shuffle.

They’re easily cast aside. Overpowered by the next big thing. Deemed behind-the-times or boring.

How do you keep your brand from falling victim, too? It all comes down to relevance.

Building Relevant Aerospace Brands

You don’t need the best technology or the latest, greatest innovation to stay relevant. In fact, if that’s all you have to offer your customers, that pretty much guarantees only flash-in-the-pan success at best.

The true staying power lies with relevant aerospace brands. Brands that know how connect with their customers on a deeper level – how to engage them, excite them and keep them interested over and over.

To do this, brands need to:

  1. Know their purpose. What’s your reason for being? Your purpose for existing? Brands that know their purpose are able to singularly drive their efforts toward that goal. Every product is made with it in mind, and every marketing message is written for that reason as well. Think of Disney. As a brand, its purpose is simple – and one likely shared by millions of parents who buy its products annually: to make kids happy. Hone in on your simple, singular purpose and let it drive you.
  2. Offer an experience. It’s not just about selling products or services. It’s about delivering an all-encompassing experience that gives customers more than just one-off satisfaction. They will buy your part or system now, and later down the line, they’ll come back for repairs, maintenance, replacements or other needs. Brand loyalty develops when a customer’s need is always met – and met to its fullest – time after time. So use data and tech to anticipate those future needs and deliver on them seamlessly and with the same passion as the first go-round.
  3. Inspire internally. Great brands aren’t made by great marketing (of course it doesn’t hurt!) The most impactful aerospace brands are ones where internal culture has created employee-advocates – people who invest their time, energy and passions wholeheartedly into the company. They believe in the brand’s purpose and they want to share its message with the world. Invest in your people, and they invest in you. It’s a simple mantra all the best organizations operate by.

The Bottom Line

Aerospace brands that can accomplish these three tasks will consistently remain relevant – no matter what tech or developments go on around them. Want to ensure your aerobrand stays relevant in the changing times? Haley’s aerospace branding experts are here to help.

 

Top-down or bottom-up: Which branding strategy is right for you?

Top-down or bottom-up: Which branding strategy is right for you? | Haley Aerospace Marketing

For large aerospace and aviation organizations, there are two options when it comes to branding: You can brand from the top down or from the bottom up.

Each option comes with its unique pros and cons, and the best choice really depends on what the company’s overall goals are, how well known and established the organization is, and the differences between its unique branches and product lines.

Not sure which branding strategy is best for your specific aviation company? Let’s examine both to find out.

Top-Down Branding

With a top-down branding strategy, everything starts with the branding of the larger, all-encompassing organization.

Google, for example, is a top-down branded company. All its unique product lines and services – no matter how different they may be – have some sort of Google connection to them. There’s Gmail, Google Drive, Google+, Google Documents, etc.

The reason for following this strategy? It’s likely to leverage Google’s known clout in the tech world. Why create a new brand name and style, when the current one is already so well known and successful? Google can give its new products a leg up on the competition simply by lending its namesake.

Bottom-Up Branding

On the opposite end of the spectrum is bottom-up branding, which has an overarching brand, as well as several sub-brands that stand alone.

A good example of bottom-up branding can be seen with the candy company Mars. Unlike Hershey, which has products like Hershey Kisses and Hershey Chocolate Bars, the Mars company’s products have names and brands all their own. M&M’s, 3 Musketeers, Snickers and Twix are just a few of the sub-brands under the Mars name.

Though Mars itself is certainly well known in the candy world, many of its sub-brands are, arguably, even more established. This is common with consumer brands – particularly ones where products vary greatly. It’s also often a result of mergers and acquisitions.

Need Branding Guidance? Let Us Help

In the aviation world, it’s not uncommon for companies to have numerous product lines or services branching off. But should those carry the same name or stand alone as brands in their own right? The question is a hard one – and it varies from organization to organization.

Want help honing in on what strategy is most appropriate (and profitable) for your aerobrand? Get in touch. Our branding experts are here to help.

 

Does Your Aerospace Brand’s Website Speak to Millennials?

 

Does Your Aerospace Brand’s Website Speak to Millennials? | Haley Aerospace Marketing

Millennials aren’t kids anymore. They make up the bulk of the U.S. workforce, and likely the majority of your clients as well.

As such, it’s important you tailor your efforts to their needs, their style and their way of thinking.

Pivot your marketing strategies to include more SEO and social media, use PR to tout the values and social causes you believe in, and most importantly, revamp your website to fall in line with their tech-savvy expectations.

Because many Millennials are digital natives, growing up with a phone in one hand and a laptop in the other. That last one is the most crucial. To a Millennial, your web presence is the only marketing tool that matters – and if it’s not up to snuff, they’ll look elsewhere to find what they need.

Not sure where to start in revamping your aerospace website to speak to Millennials? Here’s how to do it:

  • Make sure it’s mobile-friendly. This doesn’t just mean it merely functions on a mobile phone, with a bare-bones menu and a few paragraphs of copy. It needs to offer the full scope of your web experience, only on a small touchscreen phone or portable tablet. Keep in mind: About a third of all Millennial internet usage is on mobile devices. If your site’s not mobile-friendly, you’re losing a huge chunk of potential customers every day.
  • Localize your SEO. Optimizing for a few general keywords isn’t enough to reach Millennials through search engines. They’re a savvy bunch, and they know how to craft a search to find exactly what they need in a matter of seconds. If you’re not optimizing specifically enough, you won’t even show up on their radar (but your competitors might).
  • Add a blog to your site – Millennials love blogs, subscribing to them, sharing them on social media, and putting their tips and tricks into action. Blogs can also help enhance your SEO efforts, meaning you’ve got an added shot at showing up in search results when those tech-savvy customers come calling.

In the end, a smooth, seamless online experience is what Millennials are looking for, no matter what device they’re using or from where they’re accessing your site. Make sure they’re getting just that, and you’ll be one step closer to winning them over – and their potential business.

Want help getting your aerospace brand’s website in line with Millennial expectations? We can help. Get in touch with Haley Aerospace Marketing today.

 

What Journalists Want: How to Up Your Aerospace PR Game & Get More Traction

What Journalists Want: How to Up Your Aerospace PR Game & Get More Traction | Haley Aerospace Marketing

Journalists are the gatekeepers for us PR folk. They have the power over which press releases make the news, what latest developments see a wider audience and which of your competitors get valuable print real estate.

As such, cultivating great relationships with them is crucial – particularly ones who specialize in the aerospace industry.

But journalists are busy. They don’t have time for networking, schmoozing or chatting on the phone. They want to get down to business, and they want those bylines.

So how do you build great relationships with them? You give them just that.

  • Keep it concise. Journalists are big on brevity. They don’t want to read three pages of PR jargon, nor do they want to sift through spreadsheets and dozens of data points. Make your pitch as concise and to the point as possible, and don’t waste their time.
  • Know their niche. If Alice specializes in covering helicopter news, don’t inundate her with press releases about passenger planes or other info she’s not able to cover. Keep an updated list of all your contacts, with detailed information on what types of stories they cover. Try to keep your pitches and press releases as in line with these interests as possible. You don’t want to end up on any spam lists!
  • Make their job easy. Don’t make journalists jump through hoops just to give you coverage. Make their job easy by giving them the who, what, where and why up front. Use bullet points, and break down why your story is important and should be covered.
  • Give them quotes. Chasing down interviews is the worst (and most time-consuming) part of a journalist’s job. If you can give them prewritten quotes or, at the very least, a few preestablished interview times when your subject matter experts are available, that’s a great way to endear them to your brand and get them to cover you.
  • Offer them exclusives. Most journalists don’t want to cover the exact same news as Joe in the next building over. They want something unique – something that stands out and makes their story a step above the rest. Consider giving certain journalists exclusive or early access to your news, so there’s something in it for them.

Here at Haley Aerospace, many of our aerospace PR and marketing experts are former journalists – so they know what it takes to get noticed and put in print. Want help getting your brand valuable news real estate? Get in touch today.

 

The Biggest Aerospace PR Mistakes You Can Make

The Biggest Aerospace PR Mistakes You Can Make | Aerospace Public Relations | Haley Aerospace Marketing

It’s been more than two decades since we started in the aerospace PR and marketing business. And in that time? We’ve seen our fair share of successes and failures.

The majority of those failures happened in the digital age – when social media, websites and texting were the norm. Not only did these developments bring down those typical customer-business walls, but they have also allowed customers to reach brands more directly, and more publicly.

As those shifts have happened, aerospace brands have struggled to adapt. A fairly traditional industry in terms of PR and marketing tactics, there have been some growing pains for sure. Here are some of the worst mistakes we’ve seen — no names or specific details mentioned, of course!

  • Ignoring a call-out from a customer on Twitter or Facebook – Did a customer tag you in a bad review or post on your wall about bad service or products? Ignoring it won’t make it go away. In fact, it only makes the problem worse. Not only can other customers (and potential customers) see that customer’s post, but they can see your lack of response too, and that says a lot about the service they can expect from your brand should they choose to do business with you.
  • Pretending other brands in the space don’t exist – Just because you and another company might overlap on a product or service doesn’t mean you can’t work together. You actually probably have a lot of followers and customers in common, so retweeting their content, tagging them in the occasional post or partnering them in some way is actually a boon to business — not a hindrance.
  • Not using SEO – Search engine optimization (SEO) isn’t just for your website. You should also use your search terms in social posts and on your social profiles as well. This can help your account rank higher in Google searches and, by association, your main website as well. Social and search strategies should work in tandem together toward the same goal from the very beginning.
  • Ignoring the money – Let’s face it, aerospace is a big-budget industry. You’re not dealing with people purchasing $10 lipsticks. It’s million-dollar planes, parts and services in a global economy. As such, aerospace PR requires a little extra finesse. You need to recognize that your client is on the high end of the market and that those with deeper pockets deserve a little more attention. Don’t brush them aside and treat them like any old customer; make them feel unique, one-of-a-kind and important.

Great aerospace PR is really an art form, especially in today’s digitally driven world. Need help or not sure how to traverse things in today’s digital landscape? Haley Aerospace PR pros are here to guide you.

 

Are You Committing Any of the Online Reputation Deadly Sins?

Are You Committing Any of the Online Reputation Deadly Sins? | Haley Aerospace Marketing

How well do you know your online reputation? How closely do you monitor it? If you’re iffy on either question, you’re likely killing your online reputation without even recognizing it.

We’ve seen it time and time again with our aviation and aerospace clients. Maybe they ignore a certain aspect of their online presence or they fail to put the right resources behind their social media accounts. Maybe they avoid Facebook or Twitter altogether just to steer clear of potential conflict.

There’s no doubt their intentions were good: They simply wanted an easier operation to manage or they wanted to avoid conflict in the public eye.

Sadly, in the end, these actions hurt more than help. In fact, they could even ruin your online reputation altogether.

Want to safeguard your online reputation? Here are just a few of the deadly sins you’ll want to avoid:

  • Failing to respond on social media – Social media platforms are as much for entertainment as they are for plain old customer service. If someone calls you out on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram or another social platform, don’t just ignore it, even if it’s bad or nonsensical. Remember, these are public forums. Everyone can see how you respond (or if you fail to respond altogether). No response gives potential customers insight into how you operate. If they do business with you, will you ignore their calls for help too?
  • Not being transparent online – Don’t have your team members listed on your website? Do you avoid posting photos from the office or behind the scenes? Is your voice bland and impersonal on social media? Today’s consumers are tired of those old walls between brand and customer. They want to get to know you. To understand your voice and your vision. Your values and your goals. If you don’t use your digital arsenal to give them a glimpse behind the curtain, you’ll come off as cold, sterile and unapproachable, the exact opposite of what today’s buyers want.
  • Ignoring bad reviews and ratings – You should be checking your reviews across Google, Yelp, Facebook, the Better Business Bureau and other major sites regularly. If you see a common thread of dissonance, address it head-on and quickly. You’d be surprised at how much weight those reviews and ratings hold; take action now, and start turning things around as soon as possible before they snowball.
  • Not staying on trend with design and layout – If your website looks like it’s straight out of 2002, with vertical menus and flash intros, then your online reputation’s shot already. If it doesn’t work on mobile devices, you might as well stop doing business. Clean, functional, mobile-friendly web design isn’t just nice to have nowadays; it’s a downright precursor to doing business. Work with an experienced agency ASAP to fix your site if you think it may be lacking. In today’s digital world, that’s your No. 1 marketing tool, so make sure it’s sensational.

If you’re guilty of any of these deadly sins, you could be hurting your online reputation right this very second. Want to fix it and get back on track? Get in touch with us today.

 

Meet Ken Koester: Haley Aerospace’s Branding Design Extraordinaire

Meet Ken Koester: Haley Aerospace’s Branding Design Extraordinaire | Haley Aerospace Marketing

It’s time for another behind-the-scenes peek at Haley Aerospace. Today, we’re sitting down with Ken Koester, senior design director and creative extraordinaire. He’s the talent behind much of the branding, advertising and marketing collateral we produce for our clients here at Haley, and he’s got more awards than we’ve got room to list!

Read on to learn a little more about Ken and what makes him tick.

Q. Where do you get your inspiration?

A. Generally, I get inspiration from anything that has a great idea behind it and is exceptionally well done. From fine art and graphic design to movies and music. Creatively, I like to immerse myself in the world of the client and the people who will encounter what we are creating.

Q. What design trends do you see coming down the pipeline in 2018?

A. I was glad to see, in the last year or so, the return to simplicity in identity design. Simple shapes, lines, type and forms either converged or played solo to create solid, lasting logos that are easily interpreted – and reproduced. I think we’re going to see a continued upswing and more attention given to those really simple elements in the coming year.

A fairly new result from the trend of responsive web design is companies refreshing their brand identities into modern, simplified versions. Creating a logo hierarchy that can meet the user demands of an endless assortment of devices and screen sizes. For instance, there’s Disney’s hierarchy of the “Walt Disney” full lockup logo with castle, just the “Walt Disney” logotype, just the “Disney” logotype and, most simply, just the “D” from the logotype.    

Q. What’s the coolest thing you’ve ever designed?

A. An invitation to the grand opening of a unique shopping mall built on the location where John Philip Sousa and his band originally played. The invitation was a small box that you were instructed to place on a flat surface. Then you opened it by pulling a side of the box down, and a marching band wind-up toy walked out. It took a lot of engineering and test mailings, but it resulted in a very successful mall opening.

Q. What are your biggest design pet peeves? The deadliest sins of design, in your opinion?

A. Using bad photography. Nothing can mess up good design quicker than having to use poorly photographed, low-resolution images. It is always better for a client’s brand image to shoot new professional photography that is unique to them, rather than relying on stock images.

Making a brand look like everybody else in an industry is a pet peeve too. The point should be for the company to be more memorable than the competition and stand out, not be camouflaged within the market.

Q. What’s the best part of being a designer?

A. Being a designer in the creative brand marketing business allows me to work in hundreds of different industries. I get to learn all about the operation, management, sales process and customers of completely different, but equally interesting, companies.

Q. What can clients expect when they use Haley Aerospace’s design services?

A. Integrity. Creativity. Friendliness.

Q. When did you know you wanted to be a designer?

A. My parents said it was when I tried to paint pictures with my baby food. However, my first recollection of being aware of good design was watching television and the opening titles to the great Stanley Kubrick movie Spartacus. I remember just being awed by the iconic and dramatically lit photography, along with beautiful typography (and, of course, the music). It wasn’t until I was in college that I learned it was designed by one of the greatest graphic designers of all time, Saul Bass.

 

We’ll be introducing you to more of the team here at Haley Aerospace in the coming months, so stay tuned to the blog and watch for our emails. You won’t want to miss it!

 

How to Get the Most From Your Aerospace Marketing Agency (And Be Their Star Client!)

How to Get the Most From Your Aerospace Marketing Agency (And Be Their Star Client!) | Haley Aerospace Marketing

Every relationship is a two-way street, even the ones you pay for.

Just like your marriage, your friendships and your work clique, you get what you give in marketing, and the more you put into your partnership with your agency, the better results you’re going to get.

Now that doesn’t mean you need to do all the work – not by any stretch. It simply means there are some ways you can make your aerospace marketing agency’s job easier and more effective.

Because at the end of the day, YOU are the expert in your company. We rely on your input, your experience and your team as key resources in our strategies, and by working together, we can produce better results in the long term.

Enabling Your Agency’s Efficacy

If you’re paying for a marketing agency’s help, you want to get the most from it, right? The most results, the most sales and the most revenues?

Though a lot of an agency’s efficacy depends on their team, expertise and experience, you play a role too. And the better, more effective client you are, the better your agency can perform on your behalf.

Here’s what you can do as a client:

Be constructive – not destructive.

When your agency produces something that misses the mark, by all means tell them. But simply saying “no,” “that’s not it” or “I don’t like it” is not helping anyone. Be specific with your feedback and about what you like and don’t like. This is vital for your agency to land on deliverables you can approve and stand behind.

Be responsive.

If your agency has a question, needs more information or wants feedback on a project, do your best to respond quickly and efficiently. Just like with your internal workflows, delays from one party can cause bottlenecks, slowing down the entire assembly line. Any holdup will push back how quickly you can receive your deliverables.

Be honest.

There’s no reason to beat around the bush with us. We want you to be happy with the services we provide and the projects we deliver, so be honest about what you do and don’t like. You won’t hurt our feelings – we promise.

Be clear.

As much as I wish we were, we marketers aren’t mind readers. Though we do have a certain knack for knowing what others want, we can’t predict exactly what our clients will or won’t like. So try to be as clear-cut as possible with each product brief, and set expectations early on, before work begins. This will prevent delays and ensure you’re happy with the deliverable the first time – not 10 revisions later.

Be trusting.

At the end of the day, you hired an agency for a reason. We’re experts in our craft, and we’ve helped others in your place see success and achieve their goals. Trust in our expertise and experience, and rely on us when things get murky. We will always have your best interest at heart. 

An A+ Client = A+ Results

Being a responsive, honest and constructive client allows your aerospace marketing agency to do the same. And that means better results for both parties in the long run. Want to learn more about using an agency to spearhead your marketing and branding efforts? Reach out today.

 

 

Does Your Logo Have $$ Value? A Lesson in Great Aerospace Branding

Does Your Logo Have $$ Value? A Lesson in Great Aerospace Branding | Haley Aerospace Branding

We tend to create logos and then forget them.

That’s likely why some long-standing aerospace brands still have the same logos and branding they did decades ago.

They might not think we notice … but we do.

Like anything, design trends come and go. And when a logo is outdated, old and passé – it’s noticeable, big-time. And it can have huge impacts on a brand’s perceived value and worth, especially with new and potential customers.

Think of it this way: A logo is usually someone’s first impression of your brand. If you sell high-tech aerospace systems but your branding screams of the 1960s, do you think customers will see you as a leading, tech-savvy company? Likely not.

Do you think they’ll deem you worthy of their hard-earned dollars and business? Another big no.

And that’s because it’s pretty simple. Your logo conveys your value. Your worth. Your virtue.

How Much Should Your Logo Cost?

Knowing that your logo plays a huge role in how your brand’s value is perceived, it’s pretty obvious that you should devote some serious effort and resources when creating yours.

But how much should you spend? And how often should you spend on it?

There’s really no way to quantify how much you should spend on a logo, but there is one thing that’s certain: It should never be a one-off commitment. Having a current, high-quality and relevant logo requires regular upkeep, and you’ll want to have an aerospace branding designer on hand (or at least on retainer) to make that happen.

Try to give your logo a refresh every few years to keep it in line with current trends – even if it’s just a minor change of fonts or hues. You should also consider updating your logo if you’re pivoting your services or products, or if you’re making any major changes in the organization. Your logo should always reflect your brand in its current state, giving potential customers an honest, transparent peek at what you have to offer.

Giving Your Logo Value

So how do you ensure your logo conveys the right value proposition for your brand? And that it’s worth the consistent investment of time and personnel resources over time?

Here are a few tips:

  • Know what different colors convey – Different colors convey different meanings, so be sure to choose your logo colors carefully. Here’s a quick and dirty guide.
  • Make sure your logo effectively and accurately represents your products/services – Don’t mislead or steer customers in the wrong direction. They should be able to glean who you are and what you do just by looking at your logo.
  • Make it stand out – You want to be accepted by your target audience and the marketplace, but you don’t want your logo to look exactly the same as everyone else’s. Your logo should be your differentiator, telling customers why they should choose you over a competitor.
  • Be consistent – Use your logo consistently across all your marketing, advertising and branding efforts. Consistency is key in improving brand recognition and value.

In the end, your logo is one of the most important elements of your branding, so don’t brush it off. Whether you’re a brand just starting off or you’ve been around for decades, devote some time and energy to really perfecting your logo and aligning it with your products, services and value proposition.

Need aerospace branding or logo guidance? Haley Aerospace is here to help.

 

Aviation Marketing Tip No. 1: Do Your Research

Aviation Marketing Tip No. 1: Do Your Research | Haley Aerospace Marketing

We’ve been at the aviation marketing game for a long time now, so it’s no surprise when people try to pick our brains once in a while.

We’ll get questions like …

What tips do you have?

What are the best tools to use?

What’s the key to success?

And though I’d love to say we have some amazing, magical secret sauce that helps all our clients win, the truth is, it all comes down to something pretty simple …

Good research.

It’s true. Research drives every campaign, strategy and effort we embark on with our clients, and it gives us the fodder we need to deliver noticeable revenue-boosting results.

Specifically, there are three types of research we focus on:

Audience Research

The purpose of audience research is twofold:

  • to determine who to best market a brand’s products and services to
  • to understand the unique demographics and differentiators about those audiences

I say “audiences” because rarely does a brand have just ONE audience. They have a large group of potential customers, sure, but that group can be broken down into three, four, maybe even 10 subsets – smaller groups with attributes unique to just them. Knowing these unique attributes is crucial to better marketing to them and resonating with them.

Audience research can be done in many ways, from surveys and interviews with past customers to paid focus groups or questionnaires. In the end, the goal needs to be have this information about your audiences:

  • Demographic and geographic data
  • Income and job level
  • Homeownership and marital status
  • Current job or personal challenges as they relate to your products/services

Knowing this information about your potential customers will help you frame your products and services in the best light for their income, location and job position, as well as their unique personal and professional circumstances.

Market Research

With market research, you’re looking to see what’s already out there. Are there products or services out there that serve the same purpose as yours? The same audiences? If so, what’s different about them? How does your product solve the problem better or add additional value for a customer?

You want to get a feel for the marketplace your products and services exist in. What are customers willing to pay in your space? What needs are and aren’t being met? Where are the holes in the market where your products could step in and fill a demand? The answers to these questions should frame your entire aviation marketing campaign.

Competitive Research

Finally, you want to research the competition – those other brands vying for your customers, sales and revenues. Make an exhaustive list of all those competing in your space, even the only semi-related ones. Then, look at each brand’s:

  • Marketing efforts – What publications are they advertising in? Are they investing in search ads, TV commercials, trade shows or other venues? Are you seeing their name splattered across billboards? Take stock of where and how each competitor is getting their name out there.
  • Product and service lines – What products and services does each competitor offer? How are those similar or different to yours? What needs/demands are they meeting with their products/services?
  • Branding – What is their branding like? Do they seem like more of a high-priced, luxury brand or a more affordable, budget-friendly one? What colors, logos, mottos and other signatures do they use?
  • Digital presence – What is their website like? Is it up to date, high tech and appealing? How about their social media accounts? Are they regularly updated and used to communicate with customers?

Using all this competitive research, you can create an effective strategy that positions your company as a unique standout in the marketplace – one whose products solve a problem/challenge that today’s consumers are actively struggling with.

Ready for Some Research?

Research is at the heart of any successful aviation marketing, advertising or branding campaign. Want help conducting the research your brand needs to take off in 2018? Haley Aerospace is here to help.

 

Lead Generation for Aerospace Brands: Blending Marketing Automation With a Personal Touch

Lead Generation for Aerospace Brands: Blending Marketing Automation With a Personal Touch | Haley Aerospace

Marketing automation is a much talked-about fad in today’s digital world. Not only can it make generating and nurturing leads easier, but it can do it using fewer resources and, in the long run, likely fewer dollars too.

Using the latest tech, marketers are now able to build leads, qualify those leads with semi-customized email chains and often even convert those leads, thanks to automated customer service apps and plug-ins.

And when done right, it works.

But does it work for everyone, every time? Definitely not – and especially not for aerospace brands.

Automation Isn’t Enough in Aerospace

Here’s the thing: Aerospace is a high-dollar industry. Our clients aren’t shelling out $10 for a new lip gloss. They’re buying multimillion-dollar machines, parts and aircraft, and they’ve got a lot on the line when making their purchases.

People don’t hand over eight figures in cash without a serious vetting process – and automated marketing solutions just can’t provide that high-touch, personalized approach that most aerospace customers need.

So effective aerospace marketing requires a mix of the two: a smidge of the resource-saving, tech-driven automated stuff and a whole lot of handholding and one-on-one interactions.

Now there’s no exact equation for how to do this, but for most of our clients we recommend something like this:

  • A good lead magnet – This could be an ebook, a guide, a tool or just a simple downloadable PDF. Whatever it is, it needs to be something that your potential clients would want and find valuable. They’ll need to enter their name, company and email address for it – so you’ll have to make your offer worth their while.
  • A few different email funnels – When they opt in for that magnet, those leads get put into an email funnel. You’ll want a funnel for each different client “persona” you serve so that your messages speak directly to their unique needs, challenges and place in the sales process – nothing too generic or broad. Use the funnel to expose your leads to your services/products, as well as how those can help solve the problems they have at hand.
  • A team to step in at the right time – In aerospace, you can’t let your email funnel do all the work for you. If someone has opted in, downloaded your lead magnet and has been regularly opening your emails, it’s time to touch base. Have dedicated reps in place to reach out, email/call them directly, and see how you can help them with their goals and objectives.
  • A good followup protocol – There’s lots of money on the line here, so most people aren’t going to make a decision on the fly. They’ll need to think about it, run it by their higher-ups and get back to you in time. But don’t let too many days pass. Assign team members to each lead to follow up, check in and remind them that you’re still there to help.

For aerospace brands, it’s a hard balance to strike. Naturally, you want the marketing process to be as easy, seamless and affordable as possible, but in a big-ticket industry like ours, automation often isn’t enough. Want help creating your perfect mix of marketing? Let me know. Haley Aerospace is here to help.

 

LinkedIn: The Missing Link in Your Aerospace Marketing Campaigns

LinkedIn: The Missing Link in Your Aerospace Marketing Campaigns | Haley Aerospace

With million-dollar budgets on the line and world-changing projects in the works, most aerospace companies aren’t letting their bottom-tier employees make the decisions.

Nope.

In aerospace marketing, it’s all about reaching the higher-ups—the executives, directors, managers and even CEOs in charge of overall strategy.

And with more than 61 million senior-level influencers and more than 40 million decision-makers registered to the site, LinkedIn offers a pretty effective way to do just that.

The Power of LinkedIn in Big-Budget Industries

According to LinkedIn itself, four out of five members drives decisions at their organization, and the site’s audience has twice the buying power the average website does.

Twice.

So forget marketing via lower-totem tools like Facebook or Instagram. As they say, “you get what you pay for.” Invest resources into high-dollar forums like LinkedIn, and reach potential consumers with equally deep pockets.

It’s plain and simple.

Not on the LinkedIn train just yet? Here are a few ways you can use the platform in your aerospace marketing efforts:

For background research.

LinkedIn is a great tool for getting to know your customers. You can find out about their backgrounds, their careers, their interests and values, and you can even view their activity and see what articles and content they find valuable. Tailor your messaging to fall in line with these preferences, and you’ll find your conversions (and ROI) much higher as a result.

This method is especially effective in account-based marketing—a great way to make potential big-budget customers feel valued and empowered.

To show your expertise.

Though you might already have a blog, you can also publish articles on LinkedIn—a great way to show off your knowledge and expertise. Articles published on LinkedIn give you yet another way to generate new leads and up your exposure, especially if your content is liked, shared and commented on. LinkedIn also promotes various articles through its “Pulse Discover” feature, which can put your brand in front of even more eyes—even ones not connected to your brand or employees on the network.

To up your search rankings.

Like other social media platforms, simply posting content on the network helps with SEO—particularly if that content contains targeted keywords. Publishing articles, optimizing your profile and pages, and posting SlideShare content can also help boost your search rankings—both within LinkedIn and on Google, Bing and other off-site search engines.

As a direct line to decision-makers.

Perhaps the biggest benefit of LinkedIn is that it offers you a direct line to the exact people you’re targeting. There’s no cold-calling and hoping you reach the right person, and there’s no waiting for your pitch to climb the totem pole for weeks and months on end. You can message decision-makers quickly and directly, answering their questions, addressing their concerns and getting feedback in real-time.

Hone in on LinkedIn

Have you invested resources into LinkedIn yet? If not, now’s the perfect time to put it on your radar. Get in touch today, and we’ll help you create a 2018 aerospace marketing plan that uses LinkedIn—and other vital tools—to their fullest.

 

Your 2018 Aerospace & Defense Media Plan: 5 Questions to Ask

Creating Your 2018 Aerospace & Defense Media Plan: 5 Questions You Need to Ask | Haley Aerospace Marketing

It’s hard to believe, but 2017 is quickly coming to a close.

You’ve attended all the trade shows. Closed all the deals. Met all your sales goals.

And now, it’s time to look toward the future–to determine where you’ll focus your efforts, what you’ll spend your limited budget on and how you’ll ensure even more success in the year to come.

Not sure where to start? Just ask yourself these questions:

What worked this year?

Obviously, if a facet of your aviation / aerospace / defense media plan worked this year, by all means, you should do it again. Did one magazine ad bring in a lot of great leads? See what other advertising options they offer and expand your reach. Do they have bigger ads? Special issues you can be a part of? Other ways you can get involved?

Were there any trade shows that brought in a big ROI? Editorial features that got your team members noticed? Hone in on what parts of your plan were successful, and build your 2018 plans around them.

What didn’t?

Even more important than figuring out what worked last year is determining what didn’t. What efforts were a waste of time, money and resources? Which ones just didn’t deliver on expectations? Which ones failed to produce quality leads or sales?

Make a list of which efforts under-delivered, as well as how much they cost. Once you’ve tallied up all the initiatives that weren’t successful, you’ll know exactly how much you’ll save by not repeating them. Then you can put those funds toward efforts you know are effective–or new initiatives you may want to try out.

What are your competitors doing?

You should always keep a close watch on what your competitors are up to. What publications are they advertising in? Which trade shows are they attending? Where events are they sponsoring?

If they’re investing in initiatives you’re not, do your research. Could there be value in those efforts for your brand as well? Is it worth giving them a trial run? It’s likely if your competitors are seeing results, you will, too.

What’s new?

Just as important as being in tune with your industry, is being in tune with marketing at large. Are there any need strategies that have hit the scene? New social platforms or advertising methods you haven’t used yet? Dive in, and find out if they offer you opportunities to reach your target audience. If you’re not sure, reach out to a marketing pro and get some input.

Better yet, survey your customers, and get their opinion.

What are your goals?

Finally, it’s time to get down to goals. What do you want to accomplish this year? Get more customers in a specific niche? Secure more sales from existing customers? Have more visibility with potential partners in the space? These goals should drive where, when and how you spend your budget.

Map out each goal, as well as what you’re currently doing to accomplish it. This will give you an idea of what gaps exist in your strategy. Then you can plan your 2018 plan and budget accordingly.

 

Need help creating your aviation, aerospace or defense media plan for next year? Shoot me an email. The Haley Aerospace team is here to help.

 

The ABCs of Great Aerospace Brands

The ABCs of Great Aerospace Brands | Haley Aerospace Marketing

What separates the good from the great?

What makes one brand a smashing success and the other a mere blip on the radar?

Most importantly, what can you do to ensure your company is the former, not the latter?

Of course, there’s no set-in-stone recipe for success, but we’ve seen a lot of both worlds here at Haley Aerospace, and we’re pretty in tune with what makes aerospace brands successful—and profitable.

In fact, we’ve even boiled it down to some simple A-B-Cs. No matter what sector of the industry you’re in, these five traits are crucial to reaching your target audience, resonating with them and, ultimately, converting them to paying customers.

Approachable

Today’s consumers want brands to engage—to have two-way, interactive conversations with them. And that even goes for B2B brands.

Thanks to the growth of social media, providing this level of approachability isn’t difficult—it just takes some resources. Research where your target customers hang out and what platforms they use. Then, devote time and effort to optimizing your presence there, posting regular content and, most importantly, interacting with your followers.

When done right, good social media management can even help with your SEO!

Believable

Trust and transparency are also vital—especially as fear of the media and “fake news” grows. Customers fear being conned, and instead crave honest, authentic, real interactions with brands that bare it all. They want to know how it’s made, who’s making it and who’s selling it to them. After all, they’re spending their hard-earned money; they want to ensure it’s being spent wisely and in line with their views and values.

It might sound like a tall order to pull back those B2B curtains a bit, but brand transparency and believability actually has serious long-term effects for a business. According to a recent survey, 56 percent of consumers said they’d be brand-loyal for life if the company were 100-percent transparent with them.

Considerate

Now I’m not saying be polite here (you should do that anyway!). What I mean by “considerate” is that brands must consider the unique needs and situations of their customers—and not just assume each one is created equal.

Put yourself in the shoes of your audience, and tailor your messaging exactly to their mindset. What are they going through? What hurdles are they facing? What challenges do they need help overcoming? Address those concerns with targeted content (blogs, articles, e-books or even products) they can actually put to use and get value from. Be sure to segment your efforts, too; one-size fits all never makes anyone feel special.

Dependable

Aerospace brands—especially B2B ones—need to be dependable and consistent. In many cases, customers are shelling out thousands, even millions of dollars on one single purchase, and they need to know they’re getting quality products, top-notch service and absolute value every time.

This is where customer feedback can come in handy. Make sure to regularly solicit reviews and testimonials, and send out occasional surveys to ensure your customers are satisfied. If they’re not, use their input as a guidebook on what to improve and how to going about doing it.

Educated

No one wants to buy from a company that doesn’t know what it’s talking about. They want to buy from an expert—the single-most knowledgeable and experienced brand in their space.

Show your customers you’re the go-to resource in the industry. Create blogs, articles, emails and web content that answers their questions, addresses their concerns and empowers them to be a more educated buyer. The more you prove to them your expertise, the more likely they’ll come to you in their time of need (even if that’s years down the line).

 

How’d Your Brand Fare?

Is your brand in line with our A-B-Cs? Need a little help getting there? Drop me a line. Our team has helped dozens of aerospace brands become the top of their class, and we can help you, too.