Category Archives: Digital Media

Common Lead Generation Mistakes: Are You Making Any of Them?

Common Lead Generation Mistakes: Are You Making Any of Them? | Aviation Marketing | Haley Aerospace Marketing

Leads equal sales and sales equal profits. But getting those leads in the first place — especially qualified ones — that’s where the problem lies.

It’s easy to slap an opt-in form on your website and call it “lead generation,” but the truth is, that’s no more effective than a postcard in the mail or an unwanted cold call on someone’s cell phone (i.e., not very effective).

Truly impactful lead generation is a delicate mix of marketing, targeting and timing, and many businesses — too many of them, in fact — get it wrong.

Want to make sure you’re not committing any cardinal sins of lead gen? Here are the most common mistakes we’ve seen in our line of work:

Using a singular landing page.

Landing pages need to be highly targeted and tailored in order to be effective. First and foremost, they should match up with the ad or link that brought the lead in — both in messaging and in intent. They should also coincide with whatever you’re offering for their opt-in. Are you giving away a white paper on fighting customer churn? Then that landing page needs to be all about the struggles of churn — its financial costs, the stress it puts on a company’s resources and team, etc.

Because these pages need to be so targeted, they don’t really work well for multiple campaigns. For the most part, you can pretty much expect to create a new landing page for every campaign, advertisement or promo you launch. It sounds like a hassle, sure, but it’s also the best way to deliver value to the lead — and earn their loyalty in return.

Too-long opt-in forms.

Today’s consumers are busy, and they’re used to lightning-fast speeds when it comes to their online experiences. Expecting someone to fill out a 5-minute form — especially if they have no pre-established relationship with you — is pretty much dooming your lead gen efforts for failure.

Think of the opt-in like a first date — or even a precursor to a first date — for your leads. They’re intrigued, and they want to know more, but they’re not going to give you their address, cell phone number and entire life story just yet. Prove your worth, show them why you’re worth their time, and gradually you can go for the big-asks (and the big sales pitches).

Unclear CTAs.

Calls-to-action are the key to snagging the email address, phone number or other opt-in info. Knowing your CTA also helps guide your content, so that it always — at every turn — drives users to completing that action and making that connection.

CTAs should be clear, concise and highly visible on any page you’re driving leads to. They’re especially important on your high-traffic pages — places like your home page, your blog, any viral videos you have, etc. Like your landing pages, they also need to be highly tailored to what the lead is thinking, needing and expecting when they hit your content.

Buying instead of generating your leads.

It can be tempting to buy email lists, but in the end, it almost always hurts more than it helps. If you get flagged for spam (which you likely will, since the users didn’t actually subscribe to your emails!), the more your messages will go straight to spam folders — making them virtually useless and wasteful. On top of this, it also means you’re not connecting with very qualified leads. Those users haven’t shown any interest in your brand thus far, so trying to convert them into a sale? That’s an uphill battle.

You’re better off generating organic leads who actually want and need your services, and then delivering your products as usual. It’s a much easier sell when people actually want what you have to offer!

Forgetting the follow-up.

There’s no point in generating a lead if you’re not going to use it. If someone signed up for your emails or gave you their info, they were at least somewhat interested in what you have to say or offer. Find out what that something is, tap into it and start nurturing that lead until you close the sale. It might take a while, but if you put effort into building the relationship and earning their loyalty, you’ll have a customer for life.

How do you measure up?

Is your aerospace brand making any of these lead generation mistakes? Want help course-correcting and getting back on track? Contact Haley Aerospace today.

 

5 Quick Changes for More Effective Lead Generation

5 Quick Changes for More Effective Lead Generation | Aviation Marketing | Haley Aerospace Marketing

When it comes to your brand’s profitability, your lead generation efforts might just be the most important factor.

After all, more leads equal more sales potential. And more sales? Well, that means more money in the long run.

But lead generation is a tricky beast. It takes a mix of great, valuable content, highly targeted marketing strategies and stellar engagement to master, and few aviation brands have all of these assets (not to mention resources) to handle it all in-house.

Want to start ramping up your lead gen efforts to see better results? Here are a few quick changes you can make:

1. Add your opt-in forms everywhere.

Opt-in forms shouldn’t just be on the footer of your website. You also want them on the sidebar of your blog, embedded in your videos and gating your most coveted content. Make sure you’re asking for enough information to properly sift them into the right funnels too. Your messages will fall on deaf ears if they’re not highly targeted and relevant to the customer’s needs.

2. Leverage your most-seen real estate.

What is it that almost every customer (or potential customer) sees? Is it your email signature? Your Facebook page? The viral video you did a few months back? Make it work for you. Add a link or two to your most relevant, valuable content (maybe a free tool or template), and make sure there’s a way for clients to opt-in or learn more as well. Don’t let these high-traffic assets go unleveraged.

3. Start working with influencers in your industry.

Reach out to movers and shakers in the industry, and ask them smart, timely questions about what’s going on in the space. Weave their quotes into articles or resources (with their permission, of course), publish a full Q&A video or blog post, and retweet their content on Twitter. Not only does associating with these influencers give your brand more clout, but it could also mean added exposure if they share or post your work together with their own followings.

4. Always have a CTA.

Go through your webpages, blogs and other online content. Is there a call to action on every page? If not, there needs to be and fast. Every piece of content should have its own, custom-fit CTA that’s tailored exactly to what the customer is reading (and needing) at that point in time.

CTA options include things like:

* Contacting you for more information
* Downloading a free guide or content offer
* Signing up for your email list for more information/insights
* Liking you on Facebook or following you on Twitter

Just make sure it’s appropriate to the content on the page, and that it gives your brand another way to reach the customer after this initial interaction.

5. Check your analytics after every new effort.

After every one of these changes (or any other new marketing effort you take on), check your analytics. Was traffic up or down? How many opt-ins did you get? How many unsubscribes followed that? Did any sales result from the effort? Try to understand the full impact of the changes you made, and if they weren’t what you were hoping for, tweak your content, creative or targeting and try again. Use your metrics to help you hone a strategy that’s not only effective but lucrative.

Change Is Necessary

If your lead generation efforts aren’t delivering the results your aviation brand needs, then these quick changes can help. Want more advice on improving your lead gen strategy? Contact Haley Aerospace for a free consult today.

Earned Media vs. Paid Media: What’s the Difference (And Does It Matter?)

Earned Media vs. Paid Media: What’s the Difference (And Does It Matter?) | Haley Brand Aerospace

Both earned media and paid media can offer added exposure, more leads and increased sales for your aviation brand – but the two aren’t one and the same.

While both types work together to support your marketing efforts, effective earned and paid media opportunities grow from very different seedlings: the former from your brand’s reputation and influence, and the latter from your pocketbook and advertising know-how.

Cultivating both is key to a 360-degree marketing strategy that works for the long haul.

Paid Media

Paid media is the simpler one. It allows you to pay (via an advertisement, for example) to promote your message, brand or product in a certain space.

Examples of paid media include:

  • Facebook, Instagram, Twitter or LinkedIn ads
  • Magazine placements
  • Paid contributions to publications or websites
  • Google Ads and other search advertising
  • Public or corporate sponsorships

Paid media is a great way to amplify your message, while also being very strategic with who sees that message, where they’re located and how likely they are to become a customer. Paid media is also a great way to gain exposure for your “owned” media — meaning the content, blogs, videos and resources you’ve created internally for your audience.

Earned Media

Earned media, put simply, is media exposure. It’s when a publication, news organization or some other channel with an audience shares your message, products, content or anything to do with your brand. Earned media is especially powerful because it increases your credibility (it’s someone else saying you’re great — not just you tooting your own horn).

Examples of earned media include:

  • Press mentions (including quotes from your team members or mentions of your products)
  • Positive reviews and testimonials on third-party sites
  • Reposts, shares and retweets on social media
  • Shares and emails of your content, blogs, articles, etc.

Earned media is a little harder to come by, as it’s largely out of your control. You can help your case by connecting with well-established voices and influencers in your space. For our clients, that means aviation and aerospace magazines, reporters, trade shows and others within the industry.

Part of your marketing mix should be owned media, your produced content that is shared with your audience. Materials such as a website, blog, social media accounts, collateral and other materials can be used to build your brand image, promote your products and services, and educate your target audience. In addition, owned media can serve as a valuable tool to help rebuild your reputation after a crisis event.

A Three-Pronged Approach

Really, the best marketing strategy is one that combines earned media, paid media and targeted owned media. This allows you to reach potential customers at all points in their buying journey, as well as leverage key influencers and voices in your industry.

Need help crafting your aviation brand’s three-pronged marketing strategy? Haley Aerospace can help. Get in touch today for a free consult!

 

3 Mistakes New Aviation Marketers Make

3 Mistakes New Aviation Marketers Make | Haley Aerospace Marketing

If you’re new to being an aviation marketer, you’ll quickly find that it’s a unique beast.

Not only are we selling high-dollar parts, products and machines, we’re also selling experiences. Doing all of these things take a powerful grasp on both our audience and the values and priorities that matter most to them.

Are you new to the aviation marketing world? Just want to brush up on your skills and make sure you’re on the right track? Here are the biggest mistakes newbie aviation marketers make (and how to avoid them):

Not measuring and tracking

Marketing without metrics is just shooting in the dark. If you want to ensure your strategy is an effective one, it needs to be based in cold, hard data. What areas are you failing in? Where are your efforts working and where is there room for improvement? What past efforts have been successful and what led to their success? Analytics can help you answer all of these questions and more.

It’s not just about watching your analytics, though — it’s about watching the right ones. As with anything, not all metrics are created equal, and if you want to drive more sales and get more clients, you have to watch the metrics that are tied to those numbers — the conversion rates on your content offers, the engagement on your social posts and the leads you keep in the funnel after a trade show. Know what your key performance indicators are and keep a good gauge on them at all times. Let them drive your strategy and move your brand forward.

Skipping social

Many aviation marketers feel social media is a waste of time. Are high-dollar buyers really watching your brand on Facebook? Could a Twitter post really bring a new B2B vendor into the fold? You bet it could. In aviation marketing, it’s all about choosing the right social channels to focus on.

For B2B brands, LinkedIn is king, and Twitter can bring in some healthy sales as well. For B2C organizations, visual platforms like Instagram and Snapchat are great options if you’ve got amazing aviation photography because they really draw people to your brand. (You just have to know how to convert them and turn those leads into a sale after that!)

Marketing to the wrong person

You also need to know who you’re marketing to. If you’re a B2B aviation brand, you’re not marketing to the CEO of a company. Instead, you’re trying to reach a buyer for that brand — someone lower on the totem pole, with less of a financial stake and more to prove. They want you to make them look good and they want you to show them how.

For B2C brands, you need to dive into the psyche and demographics of your target audience. What’s their income level? Do they have kids? What stage of life are they in? What’s important to them and what are their values? These should all play a role in both how you market to them and what venues you use to do it.

Always keep the end-buyer’s unique scenario in mind when crafting your marketing efforts. What are their challenges and struggles? What are their pain points? How can you, specifically, help them solve and overcome them? More importantly, how can you convince them of your abilities and earn their trust?

You’re Not Alone

You don’t have to go it alone in aviation marketing. Our experts are here to help point you in the right direction — both on metrics and on strategy. Contact Haley Aerospace today for help with your 2019 aviation marketing.

 

How to Find (And Connect with) the Best Exhibitors for Your Brand at HELI-EXPO

Overwhelmed at HELI-EXPO? How to Find (And Connect with) the Best Exhibitors for Your Brand | Haley Aerospace Marketing

Next month’s 2019 HAI HELI-EXPO in Atlanta is sure to be an educational, productive and, hopefully, profitable event.

But with more than 700 exhibitors and 18,000 industry pros in attendance, it could also get overwhelming, too.

How do you know where to focus your efforts? What booths to spend your limited time on? Which exhibitors to explore partnerships or business relationships with?

This is the struggle of any modern trade show-goer — but it’s not one without a solution. Want to make sure you spend your time and resources as wisely as possible at this year’s 2019 HAI HELI-EXPO? These tips can help:

Study the exhibitor list ahead of time.

You don’t have to set aside hours to do this but take 30 or so minutes to browse the list and get familiar with at least the categories of exhibitors who will be at the event. Do it while waiting at the airport, when you’re on the plane or even just on the Uber ride over. If any names or booths stand out, jot them down on a notepad or on your phone. Make sure to include the booth number, if it’s available.

Go in with two or three overarching goals.

Having a few larger goals for the event can help you home in on the best exhibitors to spend your time with. Are you looking to for advanced avionics systems to upgrade your aircraft? Are you hoping to find a new distributor or part manufacturer with lower costs? Do you need consulting, marketing or branding assistance? Pick two to three overall goals for your visit and let those guide both the exhibitors you visit and the questions/concerns you bring up when you do.

Divide and conquer.

Instead of touring the expo in pairs or groups, give each member of team individual assignments — either a full hall or a handful of specific booths. Make sure to keep the assignments in their vein of expertise, though. Send your marketing director toward the advertising agencies you’d like to learn more about and send your CTO down the hall with the avionics manufacturers you’re considering. This divide-and-conquer method will help you make the most of your limited time on site.

Don’t get distracted.

It can be easy to get distracted at trade shows — especially ones like 2019 HAI HELI-EXPO that have mind-boggling (and massive) technological and aircraft displays to look at. Try not to spend too much time at these eye-catching displays (or worse, just waiting in line for them), and grab a brochure or flier instead. You can also snap a picture on your phone, so you can go back and check out the displays later on.

Stay tuned to social media.

Be sure to watch HAI’s social media, as well as the hashtag #haiexpo19 on Twitter. Not only can this keep you up to date on the latest happenings at the show, but it can also clue you into new exhibitors and booths you might not have heard of yet.

At the end of the day, it’s important to attend 2019 HAI HELI-EXPO with a plan. Know your goals for the trip, have a handful of must-see exhibitors and use your team to divide and conquer once you arrive. And remember, once you start talking with an exhibitor or vendor, if they don’t have the answers you want, or it doesn’t feel right, move on quickly. Your time is limited and wasting it on an exhibitor with no promise means less time with one who could actually help grow your business.

Want help with your next trade show? Want to learn more about our aviation marketing and branding services? Let’s connect in Atlanta next month. Contact us today to schedule a time.

 

How to Capture (And Nurture) More Leads at Heli-Expo

How to Capture (And Nurture) More Leads at Heli-Expo | Haley Aerospace Marketing

Lead capturing should be the ultimate goal of any trade show exhibitor.

Sure, a splashy booth and an amazing demo will get you some foot traffic, but if those visitors don’t know how to reach you after the fact or, worse yet, you don’t know how to reach them, what’s the point of it all?

Without an adequate lead capturing strategy — not to mention a nurturing one to follow it up — your trade show efforts aren’t just ineffective, they are downright pointless.

Want to make sure you’re well-positioned to capture and nurture valuable leads at 2019 HAI HELI-EXPO next month (or whatever your next trade show may be)? Then make sure to heed these tips:

Make It Easy

The faster and easier you can make your lead capturing process, the more likely visitors will be to do it. Don’t make them fill out an entire page of information by hand. They either won’t do it, or they’ll walk away annoyed (and with a cramping hand to boot). Instead, set up a laptop with a simple form on the screen. Require only the bare minimum of info — their name, company and an email address — items they can type in and enter in under 30 seconds. You can also go the old-school route and set up a box for business cards. This takes little to no effort at all and gives you more information than a basic form would.

Integrate It Into the Booth’s Experience

Your lead capture process shouldn’t be an afterthought. Instead, work it into the overall set-up and experience of your booth. Set up your form at the entrance of your booth and require visitors to sign in before seeing your demo, grabbing a brochure or stepping into your display. At the very least, have the form at your booth’s exit, so visitors who were genuinely interested in your products can give you their info.

Give Them Something Useful and Unique

You want to be able to reach your leads, but you also want them to know how to reach you, too. While a brochure or flyer can be nice, they’re not likely to stand out in the crowd — especially once those visitors arrive home with piles upon piles of them.

Want to make sure they think about your brand and your services after the fact? That they can connect with you when you do come to mind? Then send them home with something useful and unique. Maybe it’s a portable coffee cup with your logo and web address on it, or maybe it’s a set of branded earbuds to use on the plane ride home. Whatever it is, make sure it’s something the visitor will use and that it has some form of contact info on it.

Follow Up Quickly

Within a week of the show, follow up with the leads you captured at the event via email. Make sure to include a short reminder of what your booth (and your business) brought to the show, and then detail any show-related discounts or specials you’re running. You might get some bites and you might also get some unsubscribes. Use this to hone your list.

Assign sales reps to the leads you get responses from, remove the unsubscribes, and put the remaining leads into an email drip campaign. Send them valuable content, tips and guidance over the coming weeks and months, and keep your business top of mind. (You never know when they might need your services.)

The Lead Generating Marathon

Remember, lead generation is a marathon, not a sprint. Think of your booth as the initial starting line — the point where it all begins. It’s not until much later, after you’ve built up trust and delivered value, that the leads become loyal, paying customers.

Need help capturing and nurturing leads at your next trade show? Want help in other areas of marketing? Contact Haley Aerospace today or connect with us at HELI-EXPO next month.

 

The Power of Keywords…Or Maybe Not

The Power of Keywords — Or Maybe Not | Aerobrand Company | Haley Aerospace Marketing |

So-called “keywords” play a big role in SEO strategy — and sure, they can bring in leads and customers by helping people find your website.

But traditionally used, they’re just not enough to get you the business you want.

The Problem with Certain Keywords

In an overcrowded place like the web, packing your aerobrand website with keyword phrases like “best autopilot device” or “top aviation company” might seem like a good idea. But this strategy often serves up disappointing results.

Think about how many other brands are trying to rank for those common keyword phrases. Then ask yourself, how many of the users searching for those terms are actually looking for your specific products and services?

Probably only a small fraction, right?

Here’s a crazy thought: instead of labeling your aerobrand with broad terms and phrases that might bring in qualified leads, why not include ones that will only bring them in?

I’m talking about brand-specific, nitty-gritty, deep-dive terms — things like “HeliSAS” (perfect for our friends over at Genesys Aerosystems) or “aerial luxury” (a great phrase for AERIA Luxury Interiors).

These are simple, succinct words and phrases that push users directly to what they’re looking for. Ultimately, that means a higher chance of a real conversion or sale and a much more effective use of time, energy and resources, marketing-wise.

What’s Your Word?

Do you have one of these words or phrases you could include, rather than just relying on big-bucket keywords?

Here at Haley Aerospace, our word is aerobrand. It’s a term that works two-fold for us: one, it speaks to our clientele, aerospace and aviation brands. Two, it explains our services, aerospace branding and marketing.

Once you’ve determined your word, you need to own it. Use it in marketing materials, in blogs and on social media. Work it into your tagline, motto and even email signature. Be known for something uniquely you — something other companies can’t touch and something your future customers will seek out specifically from your brand.

Need help determining a unique search term for your aerobrand? Let us help. Contact Haley Aerospace Marketing today.

 

Four Aerospace Marketing Trends for 2019

Four Aerospace Marketing Trends for 2019 | Aviation Marketing | Haley Aerospace Marketing

Somehow, 2018 is coming to a close, and it’s already time to start mapping out your marketing budget for the new year.

Do you know what you’ll pour your resources into? What platforms and tools to purchase? Where to augment your staff and what trade shows to send them to?

If not, look to current aerospace marketing trends to guide you. Here’s what our clients have been up to in the past few months — and what we expect to see more of as 2019 plows forward:

1. Customization and personalization.

Today’s consumers expect a more targeted, personalized experience than ever before. No more cookie cutter, catch-all marketing campaigns or vague billboard ads that speak to no one in particular. Now, it’s all about speaking directly to the customer — addressing their exact needs, wants, desires and struggles.

It sounds hard, but thanks to the huge amount of data we marketers have access to, it’s not as far-fetched as it might seem. You just need the right measurement tools (analytics platforms, customer interviewing strategies, polls, surveys, etc.), as well as the right team members to watch that data, analyze it and act on it.

2. Embracing the unique.

Instead of trying to be the best or the most expensive or the most luxe, today’s aerospace brands are focused on being their most unique. Rather than touting their awards and high-profile clients, they’re honing in on what makes their products and services different from their competitors — and then using those differentiators to position their brand for better-qualified customers and B2B partners.

3. Going back to square one.

What made your brand successful in the first place? It might have been 75 years ago, but those same things that made you popular then can make you popular again. Take Disney’s recent reboot marathon lately. Why do you think they’ve taken to re-doing every single animated film the company’s ever made? Because those films were their foundation — the thing that got them where they are today.

When in doubt, go back to square one and look at what brought you here. Sometimes, improving your business doesn’t have to mean a total 180-degree change. Small tweaks and incremental alterations in approach can do wonders.

4. Pushing quality over quantity.

Aerospace customers are discerning ones. They know a cheap Facebook ad from an expensive placement in a trade show booklet or industry magazine. Instead of trying to get “more for less,” pouring all your resources into hundreds of unqualified clicks on Facebook or Google, focus your efforts where you know your customers are — even if it means spending a bit more (or bringing in fewer leads) in the process.

2019 is Almost Here

We understand these aerospace marketing trends and can help you create a winning marketing strategy for your aerobrand in 2019. Contact the team at Haley Aerospace Marketing today.

 

B2B or B2C? It Shouldn’t Matter in Aerospace and Aviation Marketing

B2B or B2C? It Shouldn’t Matter in Aerospace and Aviation Marketing | Haley Aerospace Marketing

In marketing, we typically lump companies into one of two buckets: B2C (business to consumer) or B2B (business to business).

It’s supposed to help us better frame our messaging — to better reach the end-buyer and be more relatable, more valuable and, ideally, more successful.

But when we do this, we’re reducing our relationships with our customers to the bare minimum. They’re just buyers. People who spend money on us. Businesses that keep us afloat.

In today’s world, marketing needs to be more personal — more trust- and relationship-based. If we need to assign it a fancy acronym, B2Me would be the best way to put it.

Looking at B2Me for Aerospace and Aviation Marketing

B2Me means:

  • The purchase is personal. It’s not just a business buying supplies or a consumer buying a product. It’s a person – an individual with a unique personality, tastes, goals and values. Your marketing should not just recognize that, but embrace it.
  • You put yourself in the customer’s shoes. Think from the customer’s standpoint: How will it help ME? How will it better MY life? What problems of MINE will this solve? Why is it worth MY hard-earned money? These are the questions your marketing strategies should address.
  • It’s customized. Whether it’s through email segmentation, unique landing pages or a personal reach-out from your customer service team, your experiences should be customized and personalized to the unique people you do business with. This is how you prove value and build trust.
  • You reward and show gratitude. Great customer relationships are a two-way street. They buy from you; you provide quality products and services. They review you on social media; you retweet them and recognize their efforts. They refer a customer your way; you send them a coupon code as a thank you gift. B2Me means putting in the work to build a good rapport with each and every customer you encounter — no matter what their budget may be.

B2Me means recognizing that customers aren’t just buyers – a consumer with cash or a business with a budget. They’re people. Individuals. Once companies recognize this — and the power it affords them — marketing will be significantly more effective and more lucrative in the long run.

What’s Your B2Me Strategy?

Need help creating a strong B2Me aerospace and aviation marketing strategy for your aerobrand? Contact Haley Aerospace today.

 

 

5 Steps to Revitalizing (and Re-launching) an Old Brand

5 Steps to Revitalizing (and Re-launching) an Old Brand | Haley Aerospace Marketing

There comes a time in any brand’s story when it’s time for a change – time to kick things up a notch and remind everyone that you’re there and you’re special.

But breathing new life into an old brand is easier than said than done, especially if you’ve got a long-established company on your hands.

So, what’s the key to revitalizing your brand and re-launching it with success? Just follow these five steps:

1. Aim for real change.

Brand revitalization isn’t about doing the same old thing in a new way. It’s about re-inventing that old thing and bringing new value and meaning. It’s about evolution and realigning your values and mission with the changing trends of your industry – and audience. It requires rejecting the status quo, challenging your existing beliefs and stepping outside your comfort zone.

2. Get everyone on board.

Make people believe in your branding – both internally and externally. To do this, get others involved in your revitalization process. Bring in employees outside of your marketing department, and get people from all corners of the organization on board. Survey customers and members of your target audience about your efforts and get their input. Don’t do your rebranding in a vacuum!

3. Give your audience a reason to care.

You’re rebranding. So what? What’s in it for your audience? Why should they pay attention? More importantly, why shouldn’t the rebranding worry them? Many customers think there are problems afoot when you start touching an old brand. Put their minds at ease by building anticipation. Intrigue them and get them excited about the changes to come.

4. Be sweeping.

Revitalizing your brand takes more than just a logo update or a new slogan. It should affect everything you do across the organization – from the design and verbiage on your website to your sales and customer services processes. Align your internal resources to make sure your rebranding is comprehensive – and consistent.

5. Measure, test and measure some more.

Know your metrics and KPIs, and track how your rebranding impacts those. You might not hit the mark right off the bat – and that’s OK. Use data to make slight changes, re-calibrate and measure again, and eventually, you’ll land on something that hits home with your audience.

Want more help giving your old aerobrand new life? Haley Brand Aerospace can help. Get in touch with our branding experts today to get started.

 

How Aerospace Brands Can Stay Relevant in Changing Times

How Aerospace Brands Can Stay Relevant in Changing Times | Haley Aerospace | Aerospace and Aviation Branding

Thanks to technology, consumers are in more control than ever. They can research and compare brands in an instant, price-shop with just a few clicks and make a purchase even faster.

And as this control grows, brands get lost in the shuffle.

They’re easily cast aside. Overpowered by the next big thing. Deemed behind-the-times or boring.

How do you keep your brand from falling victim, too? It all comes down to relevance.

Building Relevant Aerospace Brands

You don’t need the best technology or the latest, greatest innovation to stay relevant. In fact, if that’s all you have to offer your customers, that pretty much guarantees only flash-in-the-pan success at best.

The true staying power lies with relevant aerospace brands. Brands that know how connect with their customers on a deeper level – how to engage them, excite them and keep them interested over and over.

To do this, brands need to:

  1. Know their purpose. What’s your reason for being? Your purpose for existing? Brands that know their purpose are able to singularly drive their efforts toward that goal. Every product is made with it in mind, and every marketing message is written for that reason as well. Think of Disney. As a brand, its purpose is simple – and one likely shared by millions of parents who buy its products annually: to make kids happy. Hone in on your simple, singular purpose and let it drive you.
  2. Offer an experience. It’s not just about selling products or services. It’s about delivering an all-encompassing experience that gives customers more than just one-off satisfaction. They will buy your part or system now, and later down the line, they’ll come back for repairs, maintenance, replacements or other needs. Brand loyalty develops when a customer’s need is always met – and met to its fullest – time after time. So use data and tech to anticipate those future needs and deliver on them seamlessly and with the same passion as the first go-round.
  3. Inspire internally. Great brands aren’t made by great marketing (of course it doesn’t hurt!) The most impactful aerospace brands are ones where internal culture has created employee-advocates – people who invest their time, energy and passions wholeheartedly into the company. They believe in the brand’s purpose and they want to share its message with the world. Invest in your people, and they invest in you. It’s a simple mantra all the best organizations operate by.

The Bottom Line

Aerospace brands that can accomplish these three tasks will consistently remain relevant – no matter what tech or developments go on around them. Want to ensure your aerobrand stays relevant in the changing times? Haley’s aerospace branding experts are here to help.

 

Top-down or bottom-up: Which branding strategy is right for you?

Top-down or bottom-up: Which branding strategy is right for you? | Haley Aerospace Marketing

For large aerospace and aviation organizations, there are two options when it comes to branding: You can brand from the top down or from the bottom up.

Each option comes with its unique pros and cons, and the best choice really depends on what the company’s overall goals are, how well known and established the organization is, and the differences between its unique branches and product lines.

Not sure which branding strategy is best for your specific aviation company? Let’s examine both to find out.

Top-Down Branding

With a top-down branding strategy, everything starts with the branding of the larger, all-encompassing organization.

Google, for example, is a top-down branded company. All its unique product lines and services – no matter how different they may be – have some sort of Google connection to them. There’s Gmail, Google Drive, Google+, Google Documents, etc.

The reason for following this strategy? It’s likely to leverage Google’s known clout in the tech world. Why create a new brand name and style, when the current one is already so well known and successful? Google can give its new products a leg up on the competition simply by lending its namesake.

Bottom-Up Branding

On the opposite end of the spectrum is bottom-up branding, which has an overarching brand, as well as several sub-brands that stand alone.

A good example of bottom-up branding can be seen with the candy company Mars. Unlike Hershey, which has products like Hershey Kisses and Hershey Chocolate Bars, the Mars company’s products have names and brands all their own. M&M’s, 3 Musketeers, Snickers and Twix are just a few of the sub-brands under the Mars name.

Though Mars itself is certainly well known in the candy world, many of its sub-brands are, arguably, even more established. This is common with consumer brands – particularly ones where products vary greatly. It’s also often a result of mergers and acquisitions.

Need Branding Guidance? Let Us Help

In the aviation world, it’s not uncommon for companies to have numerous product lines or services branching off. But should those carry the same name or stand alone as brands in their own right? The question is a hard one – and it varies from organization to organization.

Want help honing in on what strategy is most appropriate (and profitable) for your aerobrand? Get in touch. Our branding experts are here to help.

 

Think YouTube’s Only for B2C? Think Again, Aviation Brands

Think YouTube’s Only for B2C? Think Again, Aviation Brands | Haley Aerospace and Aviation Marketing

Full of makeup tutorials, video game reviews and cat videos, it’s easy to think that YouTube is a platform best reserved for teens and tweens.

But while that demo may account for a fair share of YouTube’s audience, they’re not alone. In fact, users 35 and up are spending more time on the site than ever, and a whopping 73 percent even say they use it for how-to content on a regular basis.

That spells immense opportunity for B2B aviation brands – opportunity to reach more prospects, convert more leads and, ultimately, sell more products.

Thinking of using YouTube videos to augment your B2B marketing efforts? Here are some tips to help:

Optimize for the platform

Just like you would on your website, work carefully chosen SEO keywords into your videos’ descriptions, tags, titles and more. This will help people find you on YouTube’s search function, as well as in Google and other search engines. You should also make sure to include timestamps in your video, as this makes it easier for users to skip ahead or come back for a second look. (Show them you value their time as much as you value their money!)

Brand it

Maybe it’s a simple backdrop behind the desk or a logo on your shirt, but make sure you’re consistently showing your brand in the video. Just don’t go overboard and inundate viewers with in-your-face branding placements.

Don’t script too much

Steer clear of over-rehearsing or scripting your videos down to the smallest detail. You want your videos to be authentic and to build trust. A few mistakes here and there only add to your relatability.

Develop your personality

YouTube, at its heart, is meant to be entertaining, so have fun with your videos. Develop a voice and infuse your content with a personality that’s unique to your brand. Carry that personality through every video – no matter what the topic. It’s what will keep people coming back for more.

Enhance your videos with a blog post

Have more to say on a subject? Don’t drone on and on in a 45-minute video. Keep your videos short and sweet, and supplement them with a more detailed blog post instead. Embed the video into your post or link to it, and give it a quick SEO boost.

Aviation brands should be consistent

Have a schedule for your posts, so viewers know when to expect and tune in to your content. You should also work to build anticipation for upcoming videos by posting on social media or releasing teaser videos as you’re prepping the content.

Leverage your channels

“If you build it, they will come” doesn’t necessarily work for YouTube, so make sure to leverage your existing marketing channels to distribute your videos. Share them on Facebook and Instagram, post them on your website and blog, and send them in an email to your most loyal customers. If it’s good enough, they’ll share it as well, and your reach will only snowball from there.

Did You Know?

Haley Aerospace started as Haley Films, so we know our way around video production. Want help getting your B2B YouTube strategy off the ground? We help aerobrands. Get in touch today to discuss your goals.

 

3 Ways to Keep Your Marketing Agile

3 Ways to Keep Your Marketing Agile | Haley Aerospace Marketing

The aviation sector is a fast-paced one, with new technologies and innovations cropping up daily. Add in the constantly changing digital landscape, and it can often be hard to keep your marketing efforts relevant.

Are you using the right platforms? Are you speaking the right lingo? Are you taking out ads in the right publications or expos?

It’s easy to second-guess yourself.

And though there’s certainly a lot of trial-and-error involved when marketing in today’s quick-moving world of aviation, success isn’t impossible. The key is to remain agile while keeping these important cornerstones in mind every time:

  1. Always tell a good story. Great storytelling is at the heart of all effective marketing strategies. Your message needs to move the customer – to resonate at their core, pull at their heartstrings or spur them into action. It doesn’t matter if you’re posting a photo to Instagram, writing a landing page for a new product or coming up with a slogan for your new ad campaign. It’s the story that holds the key.
  2. Continue to innovate. Don’t be afraid to try new things. While it may be hard to get your higher-ups on board with a new-fangled tool or marketing tactic, you should make your best effort to sway them. Continuing to challenge yourself (and your customers) is vital to staying relevant and top-of-mind in today’s ever-evolving digital world. It’s especially important in aviation and aerospace, where customers don’t just want you to be on the cutting edge – they downright expect it.
  3. Engage your target audience regularly and consistently. Whether it’s through carrier pigeons or the latest, greatest social media platform, if you’re engaging and interacting with your customers on a consistent, reliable basis, then you’re doing your job. More importantly? The more you engage them, the more you get to know them – and that means more effective marketing on the whole.

The outlets and methods for your messaging may change, but as long as you keep these tenets at heart, your brand can – and will – remain relevant, even in changing tides.

Want help adapting your aerobrand’s marketing efforts to today’s savvy consumers? Haley Aerospace can help.

 

Does Your Aerospace Brand’s Website Speak to Millennials?

 

Does Your Aerospace Brand’s Website Speak to Millennials? | Haley Aerospace Marketing

Millennials aren’t kids anymore. They make up the bulk of the U.S. workforce, and likely the majority of your clients as well.

As such, it’s important you tailor your efforts to their needs, their style and their way of thinking.

Pivot your marketing strategies to include more SEO and social media, use PR to tout the values and social causes you believe in, and most importantly, revamp your website to fall in line with their tech-savvy expectations.

Because many Millennials are digital natives, growing up with a phone in one hand and a laptop in the other. That last one is the most crucial. To a Millennial, your web presence is the only marketing tool that matters – and if it’s not up to snuff, they’ll look elsewhere to find what they need.

Not sure where to start in revamping your aerospace website to speak to Millennials? Here’s how to do it:

  • Make sure it’s mobile-friendly. This doesn’t just mean it merely functions on a mobile phone, with a bare-bones menu and a few paragraphs of copy. It needs to offer the full scope of your web experience, only on a small touchscreen phone or portable tablet. Keep in mind: About a third of all Millennial internet usage is on mobile devices. If your site’s not mobile-friendly, you’re losing a huge chunk of potential customers every day.
  • Localize your SEO. Optimizing for a few general keywords isn’t enough to reach Millennials through search engines. They’re a savvy bunch, and they know how to craft a search to find exactly what they need in a matter of seconds. If you’re not optimizing specifically enough, you won’t even show up on their radar (but your competitors might).
  • Add a blog to your site – Millennials love blogs, subscribing to them, sharing them on social media, and putting their tips and tricks into action. Blogs can also help enhance your SEO efforts, meaning you’ve got an added shot at showing up in search results when those tech-savvy customers come calling.

In the end, a smooth, seamless online experience is what Millennials are looking for, no matter what device they’re using or from where they’re accessing your site. Make sure they’re getting just that, and you’ll be one step closer to winning them over – and their potential business.

Want help getting your aerospace brand’s website in line with Millennial expectations? We can help. Get in touch with Haley Aerospace Marketing today.

 

Are You Making These Dangerous Aviation Branding Mistakes?

Are You Making These Dangerous Aviation Branding Mistakes? | Haley Aerospace and Aviation Marketing

It doesn’t matter how big your company is or how many products you’ve sold. In aviation branding, even the smallest mistakes can cost you.

We’ve seen it ourselves.

Want to make sure an aviation branding mishap doesn’t throw your company off course? Here are the biggest mistakes we’ve seen to date:

1. Thinking branding is a one-time to-do.

Too many companies approach branding as a one-time project – particularly in the old-school industry of aviation.

Though your organization certainly does need a physical, tangible branding suite with defined logos, colors and slogans, the work doesn’t stop once these are checked off your to-do list.

In fact, branding never stops.

That’s because branding isn’t just a noun. It’s a verb. It’s an ongoing effort to carve your company’s place in the world – to make it stand out in customers’ minds, to oust the competition, and to strengthen the unique message and value you have to offer. It requires constant work and attention, and it should be a factor in every effort you undertake.

2. Forgetting why you started.

Your company first started for a reason. Maybe there was a void in the market you wanted to fill, or maybe you found a way to do it better, bigger or faster. Maybe you just had a great passion for the industry. Whatever that reason was, it should remain at your company’s core today.

Your branding efforts should revolve around that original vision, and instilling that initial idea or passion within your customers should be the end goal. If it’s not, refocus on what makes your company who it is – and find ways to drive that home with your target audience.

3. Being too internally focused.

Your team might have great ideas, but if they don’t know who they’re talking to or what challenges that audience is facing, they’re never going to create branding strategies that truly resonate.

Great branding requires working from the outside in – understanding your customers’ needs, wants, desires and even demographics first, and then positioning your brand to meet those unique requirements in every way possible.

It might sound difficult, but the digital landscape we live in has made tuning in to customer feedback incredibly easy. Use social media, online reviews, surveys and other tools to really get to know your audience and what makes them tick.

4. Putting the branding burden on one department.

Branding isn’t an effort reserved just for your marketing department. It should drive every strategy across every division and team in your organization.

From sales and customer service to marketing and IT, every department needs to be on board with your branding, using it to create targeted, purposeful solutions that really resonate with your audience. In fact, representatives from each team should be involved in creating your branding, so that it truly speaks to your organization as a whole from the outset.

How Does Your Aviation Branding Stack Up?

Have you made any of these aviation branding mistakes? Want help honing in on the right strategy for your unique business and customers? We can help. Get in touch with Haley Aerospace & Aviation Marketing today.

 

The 5 Habits of Effective Aviation Brands

The 5 Habits of Effective Aviation Brands | Aviation Marketing | Haley Aerospace Marketing

There are standout brands in every industry. And it’s those brands that keep everyone else on their toes – constantly working to improve, get better and outdo the competition and reach more customers.

But what is it that makes a brand stand out from the pack? What do they do that’s more effective than the rest?

In aviation, there are five clear-cut habits these standout brands share. Want 2018 to be a banner year for your business? Then take a page out of their books and do the following:

  1. Know your why. What’s the purpose of what you do? What role do you play in your customers’ lives, and how are you playing that role better than anyone else in the industry? Know what makes your company tick and let that drive everything you do – every marketing campaign, every new product, every sales call.
  2. Be consistent. Every message should tie into the next, using the same voice, tone and feel whether it’s on social media, in a print advertisement or on the radio. Your customers should be able to recognize your brand’s unique voice instantly no matter where they encounter you.
  3. Get your employees on board. There’s no better advocate than your employees. Nurture them, reward them and make them truly grateful to be a part of your movement, and that passion will carry through in all they do.
  4. Know your competition. Be aware of others on the scene, and always stay in the know about their latest products and developments. Understand what place each competitor holds in the industry, as well as how your unique value can set you apart from them.
  5. Foster loyalty. Reward your customers for doing business with you and particularly if they review you, share your products on social media or come back for repeat purchases. Customers want to feel like a valuable part of your brand, so make sure they’re appreciated for all they do.

The most effective aviation brands know who they are, what purpose they serve and the nuances of their audience and competition intimately. Want help doing all this and more? Get in touch with our team of aviation marketing experts today.

 

The Biggest Aerospace PR Mistakes You Can Make

The Biggest Aerospace PR Mistakes You Can Make | Aerospace Public Relations | Haley Aerospace Marketing

It’s been more than two decades since we started in the aerospace PR and marketing business. And in that time? We’ve seen our fair share of successes and failures.

The majority of those failures happened in the digital age – when social media, websites and texting were the norm. Not only did these developments bring down those typical customer-business walls, but they have also allowed customers to reach brands more directly, and more publicly.

As those shifts have happened, aerospace brands have struggled to adapt. A fairly traditional industry in terms of PR and marketing tactics, there have been some growing pains for sure. Here are some of the worst mistakes we’ve seen — no names or specific details mentioned, of course!

  • Ignoring a call-out from a customer on Twitter or Facebook – Did a customer tag you in a bad review or post on your wall about bad service or products? Ignoring it won’t make it go away. In fact, it only makes the problem worse. Not only can other customers (and potential customers) see that customer’s post, but they can see your lack of response too, and that says a lot about the service they can expect from your brand should they choose to do business with you.
  • Pretending other brands in the space don’t exist – Just because you and another company might overlap on a product or service doesn’t mean you can’t work together. You actually probably have a lot of followers and customers in common, so retweeting their content, tagging them in the occasional post or partnering them in some way is actually a boon to business — not a hindrance.
  • Not using SEO – Search engine optimization (SEO) isn’t just for your website. You should also use your search terms in social posts and on your social profiles as well. This can help your account rank higher in Google searches and, by association, your main website as well. Social and search strategies should work in tandem together toward the same goal from the very beginning.
  • Ignoring the money – Let’s face it, aerospace is a big-budget industry. You’re not dealing with people purchasing $10 lipsticks. It’s million-dollar planes, parts and services in a global economy. As such, aerospace PR requires a little extra finesse. You need to recognize that your client is on the high end of the market and that those with deeper pockets deserve a little more attention. Don’t brush them aside and treat them like any old customer; make them feel unique, one-of-a-kind and important.

Great aerospace PR is really an art form, especially in today’s digitally driven world. Need help or not sure how to traverse things in today’s digital landscape? Haley Aerospace PR pros are here to guide you.

 

Are You Committing Any of the Online Reputation Deadly Sins?

Are You Committing Any of the Online Reputation Deadly Sins? | Haley Aerospace Marketing

How well do you know your online reputation? How closely do you monitor it? If you’re iffy on either question, you’re likely killing your online reputation without even recognizing it.

We’ve seen it time and time again with our aviation and aerospace clients. Maybe they ignore a certain aspect of their online presence or they fail to put the right resources behind their social media accounts. Maybe they avoid Facebook or Twitter altogether just to steer clear of potential conflict.

There’s no doubt their intentions were good: They simply wanted an easier operation to manage or they wanted to avoid conflict in the public eye.

Sadly, in the end, these actions hurt more than help. In fact, they could even ruin your online reputation altogether.

Want to safeguard your online reputation? Here are just a few of the deadly sins you’ll want to avoid:

  • Failing to respond on social media – Social media platforms are as much for entertainment as they are for plain old customer service. If someone calls you out on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram or another social platform, don’t just ignore it, even if it’s bad or nonsensical. Remember, these are public forums. Everyone can see how you respond (or if you fail to respond altogether). No response gives potential customers insight into how you operate. If they do business with you, will you ignore their calls for help too?
  • Not being transparent online – Don’t have your team members listed on your website? Do you avoid posting photos from the office or behind the scenes? Is your voice bland and impersonal on social media? Today’s consumers are tired of those old walls between brand and customer. They want to get to know you. To understand your voice and your vision. Your values and your goals. If you don’t use your digital arsenal to give them a glimpse behind the curtain, you’ll come off as cold, sterile and unapproachable, the exact opposite of what today’s buyers want.
  • Ignoring bad reviews and ratings – You should be checking your reviews across Google, Yelp, Facebook, the Better Business Bureau and other major sites regularly. If you see a common thread of dissonance, address it head-on and quickly. You’d be surprised at how much weight those reviews and ratings hold; take action now, and start turning things around as soon as possible before they snowball.
  • Not staying on trend with design and layout – If your website looks like it’s straight out of 2002, with vertical menus and flash intros, then your online reputation’s shot already. If it doesn’t work on mobile devices, you might as well stop doing business. Clean, functional, mobile-friendly web design isn’t just nice to have nowadays; it’s a downright precursor to doing business. Work with an experienced agency ASAP to fix your site if you think it may be lacking. In today’s digital world, that’s your No. 1 marketing tool, so make sure it’s sensational.

If you’re guilty of any of these deadly sins, you could be hurting your online reputation right this very second. Want to fix it and get back on track? Get in touch with us today.

 

Meet Ken Koester: Haley Aerospace’s Branding Design Extraordinaire

Meet Ken Koester: Haley Aerospace’s Branding Design Extraordinaire | Haley Aerospace Marketing

It’s time for another behind-the-scenes peek at Haley Aerospace. Today, we’re sitting down with Ken Koester, senior design director and creative extraordinaire. He’s the talent behind much of the branding, advertising and marketing collateral we produce for our clients here at Haley, and he’s got more awards than we’ve got room to list!

Read on to learn a little more about Ken and what makes him tick.

Q. Where do you get your inspiration?

A. Generally, I get inspiration from anything that has a great idea behind it and is exceptionally well done. From fine art and graphic design to movies and music. Creatively, I like to immerse myself in the world of the client and the people who will encounter what we are creating.

Q. What design trends do you see coming down the pipeline in 2018?

A. I was glad to see, in the last year or so, the return to simplicity in identity design. Simple shapes, lines, type and forms either converged or played solo to create solid, lasting logos that are easily interpreted – and reproduced. I think we’re going to see a continued upswing and more attention given to those really simple elements in the coming year.

A fairly new result from the trend of responsive web design is companies refreshing their brand identities into modern, simplified versions. Creating a logo hierarchy that can meet the user demands of an endless assortment of devices and screen sizes. For instance, there’s Disney’s hierarchy of the “Walt Disney” full lockup logo with castle, just the “Walt Disney” logotype, just the “Disney” logotype and, most simply, just the “D” from the logotype.    

Q. What’s the coolest thing you’ve ever designed?

A. An invitation to the grand opening of a unique shopping mall built on the location where John Philip Sousa and his band originally played. The invitation was a small box that you were instructed to place on a flat surface. Then you opened it by pulling a side of the box down, and a marching band wind-up toy walked out. It took a lot of engineering and test mailings, but it resulted in a very successful mall opening.

Q. What are your biggest design pet peeves? The deadliest sins of design, in your opinion?

A. Using bad photography. Nothing can mess up good design quicker than having to use poorly photographed, low-resolution images. It is always better for a client’s brand image to shoot new professional photography that is unique to them, rather than relying on stock images.

Making a brand look like everybody else in an industry is a pet peeve too. The point should be for the company to be more memorable than the competition and stand out, not be camouflaged within the market.

Q. What’s the best part of being a designer?

A. Being a designer in the creative brand marketing business allows me to work in hundreds of different industries. I get to learn all about the operation, management, sales process and customers of completely different, but equally interesting, companies.

Q. What can clients expect when they use Haley Aerospace’s design services?

A. Integrity. Creativity. Friendliness.

Q. When did you know you wanted to be a designer?

A. My parents said it was when I tried to paint pictures with my baby food. However, my first recollection of being aware of good design was watching television and the opening titles to the great Stanley Kubrick movie Spartacus. I remember just being awed by the iconic and dramatically lit photography, along with beautiful typography (and, of course, the music). It wasn’t until I was in college that I learned it was designed by one of the greatest graphic designers of all time, Saul Bass.

 

We’ll be introducing you to more of the team here at Haley Aerospace in the coming months, so stay tuned to the blog and watch for our emails. You won’t want to miss it!